Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair

L. A. Fink Barnes, H. M. Kim, J. M. Caldwell, J. Buza, C. S. Ahmad, L. U. Bigliani, W. N. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims Advances in arthroscopic techniques for rotator cuff repair have made the mini-open approach less popular. However, the mini-open approach remains an important technique for repair for many surgeons. The aims of this study were to compare the integrity of the repair, the function of the shoulder and satisfaction post-operatively using these two techniques in patients aged > 50 years. Patients and Methods We identified 22 patients treated with mini-open and 128 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of July 2007 and June 2011. The mean follow-up was two years (1 to 5). Outcome was assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, and satisfaction. The integrity of the repair was assessed using ultrasonography. A power analysis ensured sufficient enrolment. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the age, function, satisfaction, or pain scores (p > 0.05) of the two groups. The integrity of the repair and the mean SST scores were significantly better in the mini-open group (91% of mini-open repairs were intact versus 60% of arthroscopic repairs, p = 0.023; mean SST score 10.9 (standard deviation (SD) 1.3) in the mini-open group; 8.9 (SD 3.5) in arthroscopic group; p = 0.003). The ASES scores were also higher in the mini-open group (mean ASES score 91.0 (SD 10.5) in mini-open group; mean 82.70 (SD 19.8) in the arthroscopic group; p = 0.048). Conclusion The integrity of the repair and function of the shoulder were better after a mini-open repair than after arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear in these patients. The functional difference did not translate into a difference in satisfaction. Mini-open rotator cuff repair remains a useful technique despite advances in arthroscopy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-249
Number of pages5
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume99-B
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2017

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Rotator Cuff
Elbow
Arthroscopy
Ultrasonography
Pain
Surgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Fink Barnes, L. A., Kim, H. M., Caldwell, J. M., Buza, J., Ahmad, C. S., Bigliani, L. U., & Levine, W. N. (2017). Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. Bone and Joint Journal, 99-B(2), 245-249. https://doi.org/10.1302/0301620X.99B2.BJJ20160055.R1
Fink Barnes, L. A. ; Kim, H. M. ; Caldwell, J. M. ; Buza, J. ; Ahmad, C. S. ; Bigliani, L. U. ; Levine, W. N. / Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. In: Bone and Joint Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 99-B, No. 2. pp. 245-249.
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Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair. / Fink Barnes, L. A.; Kim, H. M.; Caldwell, J. M.; Buza, J.; Ahmad, C. S.; Bigliani, L. U.; Levine, W. N.

In: Bone and Joint Journal, Vol. 99-B, No. 2, 02.2017, p. 245-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Satisfaction, function and repair integrity after arthroscopic versus mini-open rotator cuff repair

AU - Fink Barnes, L. A.

AU - Kim, H. M.

AU - Caldwell, J. M.

AU - Buza, J.

AU - Ahmad, C. S.

AU - Bigliani, L. U.

AU - Levine, W. N.

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N2 - Aims Advances in arthroscopic techniques for rotator cuff repair have made the mini-open approach less popular. However, the mini-open approach remains an important technique for repair for many surgeons. The aims of this study were to compare the integrity of the repair, the function of the shoulder and satisfaction post-operatively using these two techniques in patients aged > 50 years. Patients and Methods We identified 22 patients treated with mini-open and 128 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of July 2007 and June 2011. The mean follow-up was two years (1 to 5). Outcome was assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, and satisfaction. The integrity of the repair was assessed using ultrasonography. A power analysis ensured sufficient enrolment. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the age, function, satisfaction, or pain scores (p > 0.05) of the two groups. The integrity of the repair and the mean SST scores were significantly better in the mini-open group (91% of mini-open repairs were intact versus 60% of arthroscopic repairs, p = 0.023; mean SST score 10.9 (standard deviation (SD) 1.3) in the mini-open group; 8.9 (SD 3.5) in arthroscopic group; p = 0.003). The ASES scores were also higher in the mini-open group (mean ASES score 91.0 (SD 10.5) in mini-open group; mean 82.70 (SD 19.8) in the arthroscopic group; p = 0.048). Conclusion The integrity of the repair and function of the shoulder were better after a mini-open repair than after arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear in these patients. The functional difference did not translate into a difference in satisfaction. Mini-open rotator cuff repair remains a useful technique despite advances in arthroscopy.

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