Savor the cryosphere

Patrick A. Burkhart, Richard B. Alley, Lonnie G. Thompson, James D. Balog, Paul E. Baldauf, Gregory S. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides concise documentation of the ongoing retreat of glaciers, along with the implications that the ice loss presents, as well as suggestions for geoscience educators to better convey this story to both students and citizens. We present the retreat of glaciers-the loss of ice-as emblematic of the recent, rapid contraction of the cryosphere. Satellites are useful for assessing the loss of ice across regions with the passage of time. Ground-based glaciology, particularly through the study of ice cores, can record the history of environmental conditions present during the existence of a glacier. Repeat photography vividly displays the rapid retreat of glaciers that is characteristic across the planet. This loss of ice has implications to rising sea level, greater susceptibility to dryness in places where people rely upon rivers delivering melt water resources, and to the destruction of natural environmental archives that were held within the ice. Warming of the atmosphere due to rising concentrations of greenhouse gases released by the combustion of fossil fuels is causing this retreat. We highlight multimedia productions that are useful for teaching this story effectively. As geoscience educators, we attempt to present the best scholarship as accurately and eloquently as we can, to address the core challenge of conveying the magnitude of anthropogenic impacts, while also encouraging optimistic determination on the part of students, coupled to an increasingly informed citizenry. We assert that understanding human perturbation of nature, then choosing to engage in thoughtful science-based decision-making, is a wise choice. This topic comprised "Savor theCryosphere," a Pardee Keynote Symposium at the 2015 Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, for which the GSA recorded supporting interviews and a webinar.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-11
Number of pages8
JournalGSA Today
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Fingerprint

cryosphere
ice
glacier
student
glaciology
multimedia
photography
ice core
meltwater
contraction
teaching
fossil fuel
river water
greenhouse gas
planet
warming
combustion
water resource
environmental conditions
decision making

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology

Cite this

Burkhart, P. A., Alley, R. B., Thompson, L. G., Balog, J. D., Baldauf, P. E., & Baker, G. S. (2017). Savor the cryosphere. GSA Today, 27(8), 4-11. https://doi.org/10.1130/GSATG293A.1
Burkhart, Patrick A. ; Alley, Richard B. ; Thompson, Lonnie G. ; Balog, James D. ; Baldauf, Paul E. ; Baker, Gregory S. / Savor the cryosphere. In: GSA Today. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 8. pp. 4-11.
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Burkhart, PA, Alley, RB, Thompson, LG, Balog, JD, Baldauf, PE & Baker, GS 2017, 'Savor the cryosphere', GSA Today, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 4-11. https://doi.org/10.1130/GSATG293A.1

Savor the cryosphere. / Burkhart, Patrick A.; Alley, Richard B.; Thompson, Lonnie G.; Balog, James D.; Baldauf, Paul E.; Baker, Gregory S.

In: GSA Today, Vol. 27, No. 8, 08.2017, p. 4-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Burkhart PA, Alley RB, Thompson LG, Balog JD, Baldauf PE, Baker GS. Savor the cryosphere. GSA Today. 2017 Aug;27(8):4-11. https://doi.org/10.1130/GSATG293A.1