Scaffolding students' problem-solving processes in an Ill-structured task using question prompts and peer interactions

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Abstract

This study examined the effects of question prompts and peer interactions in scaffolding undergraduate students' problem-solving processes in an ill-structured task in problem representation, developing solutions, making justifications, and monitoring and evaluating. A quasi-experimental study, supplemented by multiple-case studies, was conducted to investigate both the outcomes and the processes of student problem-solving performance. The quantitative outcomes revealed that question prompts had significantly positive effects on student problem-solving performance but peer interactions did not show significant effects. The qualitative-findings, however, did indicate some positive effects of peer interactions in facilitating cognitive thinking and metacognitive skills. The study suggests that the peer interaction process itself must be guided and monitored with various strategies, including question prompts, in order to maximize its benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-38
Number of pages18
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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interaction
student
performance
monitoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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