Scale interactions and regional climate

Examples from the Susquehanna River Basin

Robert George Crane, Brent Yarnal, Eric J. Barron, Bruce Hewitson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most difficult problems faced by climatologists is how to translate global climate model (GCM) output into regional- and local-scale information that health and environmental effects researchers can use. It will be decades before GCMs will be able to resolve scales small enough for most effects research, so climatologists have developed climate downscaling methods to bridge the gap between the global and local scales. There are two main streams of climate downscaling research. First, high-resolution, limited-area climate models can be embedded in the coarse-scale GCMs, producing much finer resolution climate data. Second, empirical downscaling techniques develop transfer functions linking the large-scale atmospheric circulation generated by the GCMs to surface data. Examples of both types of downscaling, aimed at improving projections of future climate in the Susquehanna River Basin (the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States), are presented. A third case is also described in which an even higher-resolution nested atmospheric model is being developed and linked to a hydrologic model system, with the ultimate goal of simulating the environmental response to climate forcing at all time and space scales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-158
Number of pages12
JournalHuman and Ecological Risk Assessment
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Climate models
downscaling
Climate
Rivers
regional climate
Catchments
river basin
general circulation model
climate
Transfer functions
Environmental impact
climate modeling
Health
environmental response
climate forcing
transfer function
environmental effect
atmospheric circulation
Mid-Atlantic Region
global climate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecological Modeling
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Crane, Robert George ; Yarnal, Brent ; Barron, Eric J. ; Hewitson, Bruce. / Scale interactions and regional climate : Examples from the Susquehanna River Basin. In: Human and Ecological Risk Assessment. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 147-158.
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Scale interactions and regional climate : Examples from the Susquehanna River Basin. / Crane, Robert George; Yarnal, Brent; Barron, Eric J.; Hewitson, Bruce.

In: Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 147-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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