Scaling up our understanding of non-consumptive effects in insect systems

Sara L. Hermann, Douglas A. Landis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey is an important topic in insect ecology with potential applications for pest management. NCEs are changes in prey behavior and physiology that aid in predation avoidance. While NCEs can have positive outcomes for prey survival there may also be negative consequences including increased stress and reduced growth. These effects can cascade through trophic systems influencing ecosystem function. Most NCEs have been studied at small spatial and temporal scales. However, recent studies show promise for the potential to manipulate NCEs for pest management. We suggest the next frontier for NCE studies includes manipulating the landscape of fear to improve pest control, which requires scaling-up to field and landscape levels, over ecologically relevant time frames.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-60
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Insect Science
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

pest management
insect ecology
insect
insects
fearfulness
pest control
physiology
predation
predators
ecosystems
ecosystem function
effect
aid
predator
ecology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

Cite this

@article{761b2b6a880041da8164a389109fd6ff,
title = "Scaling up our understanding of non-consumptive effects in insect systems",
abstract = "Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey is an important topic in insect ecology with potential applications for pest management. NCEs are changes in prey behavior and physiology that aid in predation avoidance. While NCEs can have positive outcomes for prey survival there may also be negative consequences including increased stress and reduced growth. These effects can cascade through trophic systems influencing ecosystem function. Most NCEs have been studied at small spatial and temporal scales. However, recent studies show promise for the potential to manipulate NCEs for pest management. We suggest the next frontier for NCE studies includes manipulating the landscape of fear to improve pest control, which requires scaling-up to field and landscape levels, over ecologically relevant time frames.",
author = "Hermann, {Sara L.} and Landis, {Douglas A.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cois.2017.03.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "54--60",
journal = "Current Opinion in Insect Science",
issn = "2214-5745",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Scaling up our understanding of non-consumptive effects in insect systems. / Hermann, Sara L.; Landis, Douglas A.

In: Current Opinion in Insect Science, Vol. 20, 01.04.2017, p. 54-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scaling up our understanding of non-consumptive effects in insect systems

AU - Hermann, Sara L.

AU - Landis, Douglas A.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey is an important topic in insect ecology with potential applications for pest management. NCEs are changes in prey behavior and physiology that aid in predation avoidance. While NCEs can have positive outcomes for prey survival there may also be negative consequences including increased stress and reduced growth. These effects can cascade through trophic systems influencing ecosystem function. Most NCEs have been studied at small spatial and temporal scales. However, recent studies show promise for the potential to manipulate NCEs for pest management. We suggest the next frontier for NCE studies includes manipulating the landscape of fear to improve pest control, which requires scaling-up to field and landscape levels, over ecologically relevant time frames.

AB - Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey is an important topic in insect ecology with potential applications for pest management. NCEs are changes in prey behavior and physiology that aid in predation avoidance. While NCEs can have positive outcomes for prey survival there may also be negative consequences including increased stress and reduced growth. These effects can cascade through trophic systems influencing ecosystem function. Most NCEs have been studied at small spatial and temporal scales. However, recent studies show promise for the potential to manipulate NCEs for pest management. We suggest the next frontier for NCE studies includes manipulating the landscape of fear to improve pest control, which requires scaling-up to field and landscape levels, over ecologically relevant time frames.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018475838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018475838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cois.2017.03.010

DO - 10.1016/j.cois.2017.03.010

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28602236

AN - SCOPUS:85018475838

VL - 20

SP - 54

EP - 60

JO - Current Opinion in Insect Science

JF - Current Opinion in Insect Science

SN - 2214-5745

ER -