School and community climates and civic commitments: Patterns for ethnic minority and majority students.

Constance A. Flanagan, Patricio Cumsille, Sukhdeep Gill, Leslie S. Gallay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Scopus citations

Abstract

The developmental correlates of diffuse support for the polity and civic commitments were explored in a survey of 1,052 students (mean age = 14.96 years) from African American, Arab American, European American, and Latino American backgrounds. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that regardless of their age, gender, or ethnic background, youth were more likely to believe that America was a just society and to commit to democratic goals if they felt a sense of community connectedness, especially if they felt that their teachers practiced a democratic ethic at school. Discussion focuses on the civic purposes of education in inculcating a sense of identification with the polity in younger generations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-431
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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