School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: Connecting the Dots: SCRIPTS for Success in the Evaluation of Pediatric Rashes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although skin rashes may not necessarily prompt a visit to the school nurse's office, a rash associated with other systemic symptoms, such as fever, headache, difficulty swallowing or breathing, weakness, or abdominal pain, may cause a child to visit your office. This article describes the initial assessment and management of skin rashes in children and adolescents and delineates reasons that may prompt the school nurse to transfer a student with a rash to a local emergency department.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalNASN school nurse (Print)
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Exanthema
Nurses
Medicine
Pediatrics
Office Visits
Deglutition
Abdominal Pain
Headache
Hospital Emergency Service
Respiration
Fever
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Although skin rashes may not necessarily prompt a visit to the school nurse's office, a rash associated with other systemic symptoms, such as fever, headache, difficulty swallowing or breathing, weakness, or abdominal pain, may cause a child to visit your office. This article describes the initial assessment and management of skin rashes in children and adolescents and delineates reasons that may prompt the school nurse to transfer a student with a rash to a local emergency department.",
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