School Psychologists in the Political Maelstrom

Steven Ames Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores, first; the roles that school psychologists theoretically might adopt as change agent: non-change, technician, the social broker and the social interventionist. Then, we analyse data from a sample of practising school psychologists to see the extent to which these roles are actually manifest in their orientations toward serving as change agent. To serve as successful change agents, though, school psychologists must understand the political context, since their stance toward change almost automatically injects them into the political arena. We use examples drawn from the politics of planning literature to note how the role adopted by a change agent interacts with political structures to shape the odds of successful change efforts. Techniques for the school psychologist to learn to better adapt to political circumstances are outlined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-302
Number of pages12
JournalSchool Psychology International
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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school psychologist
Psychology
technician
political structure
Politics
planning
politics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Peterson, Steven Ames. / School Psychologists in the Political Maelstrom. In: School Psychology International. 2001 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 291-302.
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School Psychologists in the Political Maelstrom. / Peterson, Steven Ames.

In: School Psychology International, Vol. 22, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 291-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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