Schooling, Work, and Idleness among Mexican and Non-Latino White Adolescents

Nancy S. Landale, R. S. Oropesa, Daniel Llanes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the activities of Mexican and non-Latino white adolescents using multilevel data from the 1990 U.S. Census. A primary aim of the research is to evaluate whether the classic assimilation model or a model of segmented assimilation best describes the generational pattern of schooling among Mexican-origin youth. Results show that foreign-born Mexicans are more likely to drop out of school than their native-born counterparts, but the behavior of the foreign born depends upon age at immigration. Third(+)-generation Mexicans are more likely to drop out of school than both second-generation Mexicans and non-Latino whites. Youth residing in the central city or in MSA/PMSAs with unfavorable economic characteristics are more likely to drop out of school than others. Consistent with a segmented assimilation model, the generational pattern of schooling for Mexican youth differs for those living in the central city and those living outside the central city.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-480
Number of pages24
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

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drop-out
assimilation
adolescent
school
third generation
immigration
census
economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Landale, Nancy S. ; Oropesa, R. S. ; Llanes, Daniel. / Schooling, Work, and Idleness among Mexican and Non-Latino White Adolescents. In: Social Science Research. 1998 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 457-480.
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Schooling, Work, and Idleness among Mexican and Non-Latino White Adolescents. / Landale, Nancy S.; Oropesa, R. S.; Llanes, Daniel.

In: Social Science Research, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.12.1998, p. 457-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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