Screening and treatment of trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder among community providers in the United States

the Usual Care for Autism Study (UCAS) Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a cross-sectional survey of 673 multidisciplinary autism spectrum disorder providers recruited from five different sites in the United States, we examined the frequency with which community-based providers inquire about, screen, and treat trauma-related symptoms in their patients/students and assessed their perceptions regarding the need for and barriers to providing these services. Univariate and bivariate frequencies of self-reported trauma service provision, training needs, and barriers were estimated. Multivariable logistic regressions identified provider and patient-related factors associated with trauma-related symptoms screening and treatment. Over 50% of providers reported some screening and treatment of trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder. Over 70% informally inquired about trauma-related symptoms; only 10% universally screened. Screening and treatment varied by provider discipline, setting, amount of interaction, and years of experience with autism spectrum disorder, as well as by patient/student sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Most providers agreed that trauma screening is a needed service impeded by inadequate provider training in trauma identification and treatment. The findings indicate that community providers in the United States of varied disciplines are assessing and treating trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder, and that evidence-based approaches are needed to inform and maximize these efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAutism
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Students
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Social Class
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{385402ecf38a449d84319b39c13f237d,
title = "Screening and treatment of trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder among community providers in the United States",
abstract = "Using a cross-sectional survey of 673 multidisciplinary autism spectrum disorder providers recruited from five different sites in the United States, we examined the frequency with which community-based providers inquire about, screen, and treat trauma-related symptoms in their patients/students and assessed their perceptions regarding the need for and barriers to providing these services. Univariate and bivariate frequencies of self-reported trauma service provision, training needs, and barriers were estimated. Multivariable logistic regressions identified provider and patient-related factors associated with trauma-related symptoms screening and treatment. Over 50{\%} of providers reported some screening and treatment of trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder. Over 70{\%} informally inquired about trauma-related symptoms; only 10{\%} universally screened. Screening and treatment varied by provider discipline, setting, amount of interaction, and years of experience with autism spectrum disorder, as well as by patient/student sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Most providers agreed that trauma screening is a needed service impeded by inadequate provider training in trauma identification and treatment. The findings indicate that community providers in the United States of varied disciplines are assessing and treating trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder, and that evidence-based approaches are needed to inform and maximize these efforts.",
author = "{the Usual Care for Autism Study (UCAS) Consortium} and Kerns, {Connor M.} and Berkowitz, {Steven J.} and Moskowitz, {Lauren J.} and Amy Drahota and Lerner, {Matthew D.} and Craig Newschaffer",
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doi = "10.1177/1362361319847908",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Autism",
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Screening and treatment of trauma-related symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder among community providers in the United States. / the Usual Care for Autism Study (UCAS) Consortium.

In: Autism, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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