Searching for the Family Legal Status of Mexican-Origin Children: A Primer on Different Measurement Strategies

Ralph Salvador Oropesa, Nancy Susan Landale, Marianne Messersmith Hillemeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Interest in the consequences of family legal status for children has grown in response to immigration-related changes in the ethnic composition of American society. However, few population-based empirical studies devote attention to family legal status because of data limitations. Using restricted data from the California Health Interview Survey (2009), the primary objectives of this research are to identify and evaluate strategies for measuring this important determinant of life chances among Mexican-origin children. The results indicate that measurement strategies matter. Estimates of the size of status-specific segments of this population and their risks of living in poverty are sensitive to how family legal status is operationalized. These findings provide the foundation for a discussion of how various “combinatorial” measurement strategies may rely on untenable assumptions that can be avoided with less reductionist approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-727
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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legal status
immigration
poverty
determinants
interview
health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Searching for the Family Legal Status of Mexican-Origin Children : A Primer on Different Measurement Strategies. / Oropesa, Ralph Salvador; Landale, Nancy Susan; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith.

In: Journal of Family Issues, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.04.2017, p. 700-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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