Seeing with sound: Creating a training module to use echolocation for object detection

Curtis Bower, Carlos Duarte, Jared Garrison, Lucas Reid, Joseph Seegmiller, Aaron Wilson, Denise H. Bauer, Michael Anderson, Andrew S. Wixom

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This project explored using ultrasonic reflections to effectively identify an object's size, distance, relative location, and solidity to improve the use of echolocation by the seeing impaired to "see" their surroundings. An interactive test program was created to train and assess the subjects? ability to detect differences within a variable. Two main factors, object type and position, had significant (p<0.001) effects on correct identification. Specifically, solid objects or those located in front of the subject were more correctly identified. The interactions of object/position (p=0.005) and distance/position (p=0.004) were also significant. Solid object located in front of the subject appeared to be easier to identify and a correct response for the location depended on the distance. The primary results provided evidence that an ultrasonic echolocation device may be a viable tool to aid the seeing impaired. However, more studies are needed to make more conclusive statements on the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
Pages1230-1234
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2011
Event55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 19 2011Sep 23 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period9/19/119/23/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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