Segmental differences of impaired diastolic relaxation following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in children: A tissue doppler study

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Abstract

Impaired myocardial relaxation is an important aftereffect of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Infants with their immature calcium metabolism may be particularly vulnerable. However, it has been difficult to quantitate diastolic dysfunction clinically. This study used tissue Doppler to measure regional diastolic myocardial velocities in 31 pediatric patients undergoing open heart surgery. Color tissue Doppler images were acquired in the operating room before and 8 and 24 h post CPB surgery. Early (E) and atrial (A) diastolic velocities were determined. Long axis motion was assessed from apical views near the mitral and tricuspid rings and radial wall motion from the parasternal view. The study included 31 children aged 3.6 ± 4.4 years (6 days to 16 years), with a mean weight of 14.7 ± 13.7 kg and body surface area of 0.59 ± 0.35 m2. Tissue Doppler analysis of regional wall motion revealed abnormal left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) diastolic relaxation in the early postoperative phase after CPB. Initially, all segments were significantly altered, but by 24 h, regional differences became apparent: LV radial wall motion was recovered, while longitudinal fibers in LV and RV appeared to be less resilient. RV myocardial mechanics were most abnormal. Tissue Doppler analysis may deepen our understanding of myocardial recovery and offers a sensitive tool to compare different cardioprotective strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)904-908
Number of pages5
JournalArtificial organs
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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