Selectivity of Black Death mortality with respect to preexisting health

Sharon N. DeWitte, James W. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Was the mortality associated with the deadliest known epidemic in human history, the Black Death of 1347-1351, selective with respect to preexisting health conditions ("frailty")? Many researchers have assumed that the Black Death was so virulent, and the European population so immunologically naïve, that the epidemic killed indiscriminately, irrespective of age, sex, or frailty. If this were true, Black Death cemeteries would provide unbiased crosssections of demographic and epidemiological conditions in 14th-century Europe. Using skeletal remains from medieval England and Denmark, new methods of paleodemographic age estimation, and a recent multistate model of selective mortality, we test the assumption that the mid-14th-century Black Death killed indiscriminately. Skeletons from the East Smithfield Black Death cemetery in London are compared with normal, nonepidemic cemetery samples from two medieval Danish towns (Viborg and Odense). The results suggest that the Black Death did not kill indiscriminately - that it was, in fact, selective with respect to frailty, although probably not as strongly selective as normal mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1436-1441
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume105
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2008

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Plague
Cemeteries
Mortality
Health
New England
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Denmark
Skeleton
History
Research Personnel
Demography
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

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Selectivity of Black Death mortality with respect to preexisting health. / DeWitte, Sharon N.; Wood, James W.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 105, No. 5, 05.02.2008, p. 1436-1441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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