Self-acceptance of negative emotions: The positive relationship with effective cognitive reappraisal

Yogev Kivity, Maya Tamir, Jonathan D. Huppert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas some theories of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) propose that acceptance and reappraisal conflict with one another, we propose that one component of acceptance, self-acceptance of negative emotions (being nonjudgmental of oneself for experiencing negative emotions), and reappraisal may facilitate one another. We hypothesized that emotion regulation (self-efficacy and frequency of suppression and reappraisal) would be associated with a stronger correlation between self-acceptance and more positive/less negative affect. We also examined whether self-acceptance is associated with a stronger correlation between emotion regulation and affect. Participants (n = 267) completed measures of self-acceptance, affect, and emotion regulation. Use of emotion regulation strategies was associated with stronger relationships between self-acceptance and affect, and self-acceptance was associated with stronger relationships between emotion regulation and affect. This suggests that self-acceptance and emotion regulation can facilitate, rather than conflict with one another. Clinically, self-acceptance may improve outcomes when integrated into CBT in addition to reappraisal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-294
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Cognitive Therapy
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Emotions
Cognitive Therapy
Self Efficacy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

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Self-acceptance of negative emotions : The positive relationship with effective cognitive reappraisal. / Kivity, Yogev; Tamir, Maya; Huppert, Jonathan D.

In: International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.01.2016, p. 279-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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