Self-affirmation facilitates minority middle schoolers’ progress along college trajectories

J. Parker Goyer, Julio Garcia, Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, Kevin R. Binning, Jonathan E. Cook, Stephanie L. Reeves, Nancy Apfel, Suzanne Taborsky-Barba, David K. Sherman, Geoffrey L. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small but timely experiences can have long-term benefits when their psychological effects interact with institutional processes. In a followup of two randomized field experiments, a brief values affirmation intervention designed to buffer minority middle schoolers against the threat of negative stereotypes had long-term benefits on college-relevant outcomes. In study 1, conducted in the Mountain West, the intervention increased Latino Americans’ probability of entering a college readiness track rather than a remedial one near the transition to high school 2 y later. In study 2, conducted in the Northeast, the intervention increased African Americans’ probability of college enrollment 7–9 y later. Among those who enrolled in college, affirmed African Americans attended relatively more selective colleges. Lifting a psychological barrier at a key transition can facilitate students’ access to positive institutional channels, giving rise to accumulative benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7594-7599
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume114
Issue number29
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 18 2017

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African Americans
Psychology
Hispanic Americans
Buffers
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Goyer, J. Parker ; Garcia, Julio ; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie ; Binning, Kevin R. ; Cook, Jonathan E. ; Reeves, Stephanie L. ; Apfel, Nancy ; Taborsky-Barba, Suzanne ; Sherman, David K. ; Cohen, Geoffrey L. / Self-affirmation facilitates minority middle schoolers’ progress along college trajectories. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2017 ; Vol. 114, No. 29. pp. 7594-7599.
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Goyer, JP, Garcia, J, Purdie-Vaughns, V, Binning, KR, Cook, JE, Reeves, SL, Apfel, N, Taborsky-Barba, S, Sherman, DK & Cohen, GL 2017, 'Self-affirmation facilitates minority middle schoolers’ progress along college trajectories', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 114, no. 29, pp. 7594-7599. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617923114

Self-affirmation facilitates minority middle schoolers’ progress along college trajectories. / Goyer, J. Parker; Garcia, Julio; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Binning, Kevin R.; Cook, Jonathan E.; Reeves, Stephanie L.; Apfel, Nancy; Taborsky-Barba, Suzanne; Sherman, David K.; Cohen, Geoffrey L.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 114, No. 29, 18.07.2017, p. 7594-7599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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