Self-control capacity as a predictor of borderline personality disorder features, problematic drinking, and their co-occurrence

Benjamin N. Johnson, Melinda L. Ashe, Stephen J. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) share impulsivity as an etiological factor. However, impulsivity is illdefined, often overlapping with self-control capacity. This study attempts to disentangle these constructs and their associations with alcohol use and BPD. Undergraduates (n = 192) completed the Five Factor Model Rating Form, which generated two-dimensional scales of BPD, the Self-Control Scale, the UPPS-P (self-reported impulsivity), and the stop-signal and delay discounting tasks (laboratory-measured impulsivity). Self-control appeared as a major predictor of BPD features and drinking, explaining as much or more variance in outcome than impulsivity. Co-occurrence of elevated BPD features and problem drinking was also best explained by self-control. Laboratory measures of impulsivity were not correlated with BPD scales or alcohol use. Self-regulatory capacity may be an important but overlooked factor in BPD and alcohol use and should be considered alongside impulsivity in future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-305
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of personality disorders
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Borderline Personality Disorder
Impulsive Behavior
Drinking
Alcohols
Self-Control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Self-control capacity as a predictor of borderline personality disorder features, problematic drinking, and their co-occurrence. / Johnson, Benjamin N.; Ashe, Melinda L.; Wilson, Stephen J.

In: Journal of personality disorders, Vol. 31, No. 3, 01.01.2017, p. 289-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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