Self-control Puts Character into Action

Examining How Leader Character Strengths and Ethical Leadership Relate to Leader Outcomes

John Joseph Sosik, Jae Uk Chun, Ziya Ete, Fil J. Arenas, Joel A. Scherer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence from a growing number of studies suggests leader character as a means to advance leadership knowledge and practice. Based on this evidence, we propose a process model depicting how leader character manifests in ethical leadership that has positive psychological and performance outcomes for leaders, along with the moderating effect of leaders’ self-control on the character strength–ethical leadership–outcomes relationships. We tested this model using multisource data from 218 U.S. Air Force officers (who rated their honesty/humility, empathy, moral courage, self-control, and psychological flourishing) and their subordinates (who rated their officer’s ethical leadership) and superiors (who rated the officers’ in-role performance). Findings provide initial support for leader character as a mechanism triggering positive outcomes such that only when officers reported a high level of self-control did their honesty/humility, empathy, and moral courage manifest in ethical leadership, associated with higher levels of psychological flourishing and in-role performance. We discuss the implications of these results for future theory development, research, and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 8 2018

Fingerprint

self-control
leadership
leader
empathy
performance
air force
research and development
evidence
Self-control
Ethical leadership
Psychological
Courage
Flourishing
Empathy
Humility
Honesty

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Law

Cite this

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Self-control Puts Character into Action : Examining How Leader Character Strengths and Ethical Leadership Relate to Leader Outcomes. / Sosik, John Joseph; Chun, Jae Uk; Ete, Ziya; Arenas, Fil J.; Scherer, Joel A.

In: Journal of Business Ethics, 08.05.2018, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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