Self-control Puts Character into Action: Examining How Leader Character Strengths and Ethical Leadership Relate to Leader Outcomes

John Joseph Sosik, Jae Uk Chun, Ziya Ete, Fil J. Arenas, Joel A. Scherer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence from a growing number of studies suggests leader character as a means to advance leadership knowledge and practice. Based on this evidence, we propose a process model depicting how leader character manifests in ethical leadership that has positive psychological and performance outcomes for leaders, along with the moderating effect of leaders’ self-control on the character strength–ethical leadership–outcomes relationships. We tested this model using multisource data from 218 U.S. Air Force officers (who rated their honesty/humility, empathy, moral courage, self-control, and psychological flourishing) and their subordinates (who rated their officer’s ethical leadership) and superiors (who rated the officers’ in-role performance). Findings provide initial support for leader character as a mechanism triggering positive outcomes such that only when officers reported a high level of self-control did their honesty/humility, empathy, and moral courage manifest in ethical leadership, associated with higher levels of psychological flourishing and in-role performance. We discuss the implications of these results for future theory development, research, and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 8 2018

Fingerprint

self-control
leadership
leader
empathy
performance
air force
research and development
evidence
Self-control
Ethical leadership
Psychological
Courage
Flourishing
Empathy
Humility
Honesty

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Law

Cite this

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Self-control Puts Character into Action : Examining How Leader Character Strengths and Ethical Leadership Relate to Leader Outcomes. / Sosik, John Joseph; Chun, Jae Uk; Ete, Ziya; Arenas, Fil J.; Scherer, Joel A.

In: Journal of Business Ethics, 08.05.2018, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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