Self-handicapping prior to academic-oriented tasks in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Medication effects and comparisons with controls

Daniel A. Waschbusch, Rebecca Craig, William E. Pelham, Sara King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined self-handicapping prior to academic-oriented tasks in children with and without ADHD and examined whether stimulant medication influenced self-handicapping. Participants were 61 children ages 6 to 13, including 22 children with ADHD tested after taking a placebo, 21 children with ADHD tested after taking stimulant medication, and 18 non-ADHD controls. Participants completed three measures of self handicapping and also completed self-evaluations of their performance. Results showed greater self handicapping and more positive self-evaluations in children with ADHD than in controls regardless of medication condition. Findings suggest children with ADHD may use self handicapping to ameliorate the effects of experiencing high rates of academic failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-286
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Ego
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Placebos

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Self-handicapping prior to academic-oriented tasks in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) : Medication effects and comparisons with controls. / Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Craig, Rebecca; Pelham, William E.; King, Sara.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 275-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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