Selling desire: Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Since at least the early twentieth century, US ideas of modernity have been strongly linked to the concepts of both innovation and planned obsolescence. As a nation, the US has retained an identity as a powerhouse, not only of new technologies, but also of the processes of their production. In almost every year since 1890, the US has led the world in patent grants awarded, often producing more than twice the number of patents than the country in second place. 2 Yet innovation has been only half the story. Since the late nineteenth century, the US has embraced both a capitalist and in many respects libertarian business model. This model seeks to maximize profits through mass production rather than higher prices and, in comparison to many European countries, little regulation aside from that which guarantees “free trade.”.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages100-118
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781351719445
ISBN (Print)9781138746411
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

social stratification
commercialization
selling
patent
planned obsolescence
Sales
Innovation
innovation
Obsolescence
mass production
gender
free trade
grant
modernity
new technology
guarantee
Profitability
profit
nineteenth century
twentieth century

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Staub, A. (2018). Selling desire: Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living. In The Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender (pp. 100-118). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781315180472
Staub, Alexandra. / Selling desire : Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living. The Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender. Taylor and Francis, 2018. pp. 100-118
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Staub, A 2018, Selling desire: Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living. in The Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender. Taylor and Francis, pp. 100-118. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781315180472

Selling desire : Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living. / Staub, Alexandra.

The Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender. Taylor and Francis, 2018. p. 100-118.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Staub A. Selling desire: Gender constructs, social stratification, and the commercialization of modern living. In The Routledge Companion to Modernity, Space and Gender. Taylor and Francis. 2018. p. 100-118 https://doi.org/10.1201/9781315180472