Sensory responses to fat are not affected by varying dietary energy intake from fat and saturated fat over ranges common in the American diet

Jean Xavier Guinard, Pamela J. Sechevich, Kate Meaker, Satya S. Jonnalagadda, Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of manipulating dietary fat in foods on sensitivity and hedonic response to fat in selected foods. Design: Twenty subjects were randomly assigned to a sequence of three 8-week experimental diets (average American diet, step 1 diet, low-saturated-fat diet) that varied in energy from fat (37%, 30%, and 26%, respectively) and saturated fat (17%, 10%, and 6%, respectively). Subjects participated in sensory tests designed to assess their sensitivity to and liking for fat in several foods before the study (baseline), after consumption of each diet, and after the study (washout). Subjects/setting: Subjects were participants in the Dietary Effects on Lipoprotein and Thrombogenic Activity (DELTA) study. Results: No significant differences were found among diets for difference thresholds (ie, just noticeable differences) for fat in milk and pudding, ad libitum mixing of low- and high-fat samples of milk and soup, and hedonic scaling of fat concentrations in milk and muffins and of cheese, mayonnaise, hot dog, and pastry samples. Applications/conclusions: Within the dietary fat ranges and for the fat stimuli tested in this study, dietary fat as percentage of energy from fat and saturated fat was not a significant determinant of sensitivity to and/or liking for fat. Sensory factors should not be a barrier to the implementation of low-fat diets such as the step 1 and low-saturated-fat diets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)690-696
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Energy Intake
energy intake
Fats
Diet
lipids
diet
dietary fat
Fat-Restricted Diet
Dietary Fats
Milk
Pleasure
Food
puddings
muffins
pastries
mayonnaise
saturated fats
milk
hot dogs
soups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "Sensory responses to fat are not affected by varying dietary energy intake from fat and saturated fat over ranges common in the American diet",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effects of manipulating dietary fat in foods on sensitivity and hedonic response to fat in selected foods. Design: Twenty subjects were randomly assigned to a sequence of three 8-week experimental diets (average American diet, step 1 diet, low-saturated-fat diet) that varied in energy from fat (37{\%}, 30{\%}, and 26{\%}, respectively) and saturated fat (17{\%}, 10{\%}, and 6{\%}, respectively). Subjects participated in sensory tests designed to assess their sensitivity to and liking for fat in several foods before the study (baseline), after consumption of each diet, and after the study (washout). Subjects/setting: Subjects were participants in the Dietary Effects on Lipoprotein and Thrombogenic Activity (DELTA) study. Results: No significant differences were found among diets for difference thresholds (ie, just noticeable differences) for fat in milk and pudding, ad libitum mixing of low- and high-fat samples of milk and soup, and hedonic scaling of fat concentrations in milk and muffins and of cheese, mayonnaise, hot dog, and pastry samples. Applications/conclusions: Within the dietary fat ranges and for the fat stimuli tested in this study, dietary fat as percentage of energy from fat and saturated fat was not a significant determinant of sensitivity to and/or liking for fat. Sensory factors should not be a barrier to the implementation of low-fat diets such as the step 1 and low-saturated-fat diets.",
author = "Guinard, {Jean Xavier} and Sechevich, {Pamela J.} and Kate Meaker and Jonnalagadda, {Satya S.} and Kris-Etherton, {Penny Margaret}",
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Sensory responses to fat are not affected by varying dietary energy intake from fat and saturated fat over ranges common in the American diet. / Guinard, Jean Xavier; Sechevich, Pamela J.; Meaker, Kate; Jonnalagadda, Satya S.; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 99, No. 6, 01.01.1999, p. 690-696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Sensory responses to fat are not affected by varying dietary energy intake from fat and saturated fat over ranges common in the American diet

AU - Guinard, Jean Xavier

AU - Sechevich, Pamela J.

AU - Meaker, Kate

AU - Jonnalagadda, Satya S.

AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret

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