Serum Bile Acid Levels in Protracted Diarrhea of Infancy

Laurence M. Demers, John D. Lloyd-Still

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significant elevations in two glycineconjugated serum bile acid levels (cholic and chenodeoxycholic) were detected in a majority of infants with intractable diarrhea of infancy. In contrast, children with chronic inflammatory bowel disease had values of serum bile acids within the normal range. Although intravenous alimentation and constant-infusion elemental diet may alter hepatic function, serum bile acid levels were also elevated in other infants with intractable diarrhea not treated by these methods. We hypothesize that endotoxemia or other unknown mechanisms together with therapy are exerting a detrimental effect on hepatic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1003
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume132
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1978

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Bile Acids and Salts
Diarrhea
Serum
Formulated Food
Endotoxemia
Liver
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Reference Values
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Demers, Laurence M. ; Lloyd-Still, John D. / Serum Bile Acid Levels in Protracted Diarrhea of Infancy. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1978 ; Vol. 132, No. 10. pp. 1001-1003.
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Serum Bile Acid Levels in Protracted Diarrhea of Infancy. / Demers, Laurence M.; Lloyd-Still, John D.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 132, No. 10, 10.1978, p. 1001-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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