Severe Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis With Significantly Elevated Ferritin Levels in an Immunocompetent Host in Pennsylvania: A Case Report

Mona L. Camacci, Ronaldo Paolo Panganiban, Zachary Pattison, Kamyar Haghayeghi, Alexander Daly, Cindy Ojevwe, Ryan J. Munyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is a tick-borne, infectious disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum that generally presents with nonspecific symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, malaise, and myalgia. If not treated immediately, HGA can cause hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a well-documented but underrecognized sequela of severe HGA. In this article, we report a case of severe HGA with hyperferritinemia in a 74-year-old male from Central Pennsylvania who initially presented with recurrent fevers, nausea, and malaise to our emergency department and was subsequently discharged home that same day. Ten days later, the patient returned with acute kidney injury, elevated liver transaminases, and profound hyperferritinemia to 5130 ng/mL. Empiric doxycycline was administered for suspected tick-borne disease and serologies eventually came back positive for anti–Anaplasma phagocytophilum antibodies. The patient returned to baseline status 15 days after discharge. Our case shows the challenges in the timely diagnosis of HGA and highlights the role of serum ferritin in aiding this diagnosis. Although our patient did not fulfill the HLH diagnostic criteria, our report demonstrates the importance of recognizing HGA as a reversible cause of HLH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 12 2018

Fingerprint

Anaplasmosis
Ferritins
Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis
empirics
cause
Antibodies
Liver
Tick-Borne Diseases
contagious disease
diagnostic
Disease
Fever
Anaplasma phagocytophilum
Chills
Doxycycline
Myalgia
Serology
Transaminases
Acute Kidney Injury
Nausea

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research

Cite this

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title = "Severe Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis With Significantly Elevated Ferritin Levels in an Immunocompetent Host in Pennsylvania: A Case Report",
abstract = "Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is a tick-borne, infectious disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum that generally presents with nonspecific symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, malaise, and myalgia. If not treated immediately, HGA can cause hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a well-documented but underrecognized sequela of severe HGA. In this article, we report a case of severe HGA with hyperferritinemia in a 74-year-old male from Central Pennsylvania who initially presented with recurrent fevers, nausea, and malaise to our emergency department and was subsequently discharged home that same day. Ten days later, the patient returned with acute kidney injury, elevated liver transaminases, and profound hyperferritinemia to 5130 ng/mL. Empiric doxycycline was administered for suspected tick-borne disease and serologies eventually came back positive for anti–Anaplasma phagocytophilum antibodies. The patient returned to baseline status 15 days after discharge. Our case shows the challenges in the timely diagnosis of HGA and highlights the role of serum ferritin in aiding this diagnosis. Although our patient did not fulfill the HLH diagnostic criteria, our report demonstrates the importance of recognizing HGA as a reversible cause of HLH.",
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Severe Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis With Significantly Elevated Ferritin Levels in an Immunocompetent Host in Pennsylvania : A Case Report. / Camacci, Mona L.; Panganiban, Ronaldo Paolo; Pattison, Zachary; Haghayeghi, Kamyar; Daly, Alexander; Ojevwe, Cindy; Munyon, Ryan J.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports, Vol. 6, 12.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Camacci, Mona L.

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AU - Pattison, Zachary

AU - Haghayeghi, Kamyar

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AU - Ojevwe, Cindy

AU - Munyon, Ryan J.

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