Sex- and age-adjusted population analysis of prevalence estimates for hidradenitis suppurativa in the United States

Amit Garg, Joslyn Sciacca Kirby, Jonathan Lavian, Gloria Lin, Andrew Strunk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE The true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is unknown. OBJECTIVE To establish standardized overall and group-specific prevalence estimates for HS in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective analysis included a demographically heterogeneous population-based sample of more than 48 million unique patients across all US census regions. As of October 27, 2016, a total of 47 690 patients with HS were identified using electronic health record data. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized overall point prevalence for HS and sex-, age-, and race-specific prevalence estimates of HS in the general US population. RESULTS Of the 47 690 patients with HS (26.2%men and 73.8% women), the overall HS prevalence in the US population sample was 0.10%, or 98 per 100 000 persons (95%CI, 97-99 per 100 000 persons). The adjusted prevalence in women was 137 per 100 000 (95% CI, 136-139 per 100 000), more than twice that of men (58 per 100 000; 95%CI, 57-59 per 100 000; P < .001). The prevalence of HS was highest among patients aged 30 to 39 years (172 per 100 000; 95%CI, 169-275 per 100 000) compared with all other age groups (range, 15-150 per 100 000; P < .001). Adjusted HS prevalences among African American (296 per 100 000; 95%CI, 291-300 per 100 000) and biracial (218 per 100 000; 95%CI, 202-235 per 100 000) patients were more than 3-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than that among white patients (95 per 100 000; 95%CI, 94-96 per 100 000; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hidradenitis suppurativa is an uncommon, but not rare, disease in the United States that disproportionately affects female patients, young adults, and African American and biracial patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)760-764
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA Dermatology
Volume153
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Hidradenitis Suppurativa
Population
African Americans
Electronic Health Records
Censuses
Rare Diseases
Young Adult
Age Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Garg, Amit ; Sciacca Kirby, Joslyn ; Lavian, Jonathan ; Lin, Gloria ; Strunk, Andrew. / Sex- and age-adjusted population analysis of prevalence estimates for hidradenitis suppurativa in the United States. In: JAMA Dermatology. 2017 ; Vol. 153, No. 8. pp. 760-764.
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abstract = "IMPORTANCE The true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is unknown. OBJECTIVE To establish standardized overall and group-specific prevalence estimates for HS in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective analysis included a demographically heterogeneous population-based sample of more than 48 million unique patients across all US census regions. As of October 27, 2016, a total of 47 690 patients with HS were identified using electronic health record data. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized overall point prevalence for HS and sex-, age-, and race-specific prevalence estimates of HS in the general US population. RESULTS Of the 47 690 patients with HS (26.2{\%}men and 73.8{\%} women), the overall HS prevalence in the US population sample was 0.10{\%}, or 98 per 100 000 persons (95{\%}CI, 97-99 per 100 000 persons). The adjusted prevalence in women was 137 per 100 000 (95{\%} CI, 136-139 per 100 000), more than twice that of men (58 per 100 000; 95{\%}CI, 57-59 per 100 000; P < .001). The prevalence of HS was highest among patients aged 30 to 39 years (172 per 100 000; 95{\%}CI, 169-275 per 100 000) compared with all other age groups (range, 15-150 per 100 000; P < .001). Adjusted HS prevalences among African American (296 per 100 000; 95{\%}CI, 291-300 per 100 000) and biracial (218 per 100 000; 95{\%}CI, 202-235 per 100 000) patients were more than 3-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than that among white patients (95 per 100 000; 95{\%}CI, 94-96 per 100 000; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hidradenitis suppurativa is an uncommon, but not rare, disease in the United States that disproportionately affects female patients, young adults, and African American and biracial patients.",
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Sex- and age-adjusted population analysis of prevalence estimates for hidradenitis suppurativa in the United States. / Garg, Amit; Sciacca Kirby, Joslyn; Lavian, Jonathan; Lin, Gloria; Strunk, Andrew.

In: JAMA Dermatology, Vol. 153, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 760-764.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Sex- and age-adjusted population analysis of prevalence estimates for hidradenitis suppurativa in the United States

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AU - Strunk, Andrew

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N2 - IMPORTANCE The true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is unknown. OBJECTIVE To establish standardized overall and group-specific prevalence estimates for HS in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective analysis included a demographically heterogeneous population-based sample of more than 48 million unique patients across all US census regions. As of October 27, 2016, a total of 47 690 patients with HS were identified using electronic health record data. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized overall point prevalence for HS and sex-, age-, and race-specific prevalence estimates of HS in the general US population. RESULTS Of the 47 690 patients with HS (26.2%men and 73.8% women), the overall HS prevalence in the US population sample was 0.10%, or 98 per 100 000 persons (95%CI, 97-99 per 100 000 persons). The adjusted prevalence in women was 137 per 100 000 (95% CI, 136-139 per 100 000), more than twice that of men (58 per 100 000; 95%CI, 57-59 per 100 000; P < .001). The prevalence of HS was highest among patients aged 30 to 39 years (172 per 100 000; 95%CI, 169-275 per 100 000) compared with all other age groups (range, 15-150 per 100 000; P < .001). Adjusted HS prevalences among African American (296 per 100 000; 95%CI, 291-300 per 100 000) and biracial (218 per 100 000; 95%CI, 202-235 per 100 000) patients were more than 3-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than that among white patients (95 per 100 000; 95%CI, 94-96 per 100 000; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hidradenitis suppurativa is an uncommon, but not rare, disease in the United States that disproportionately affects female patients, young adults, and African American and biracial patients.

AB - IMPORTANCE The true prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is unknown. OBJECTIVE To establish standardized overall and group-specific prevalence estimates for HS in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective analysis included a demographically heterogeneous population-based sample of more than 48 million unique patients across all US census regions. As of October 27, 2016, a total of 47 690 patients with HS were identified using electronic health record data. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized overall point prevalence for HS and sex-, age-, and race-specific prevalence estimates of HS in the general US population. RESULTS Of the 47 690 patients with HS (26.2%men and 73.8% women), the overall HS prevalence in the US population sample was 0.10%, or 98 per 100 000 persons (95%CI, 97-99 per 100 000 persons). The adjusted prevalence in women was 137 per 100 000 (95% CI, 136-139 per 100 000), more than twice that of men (58 per 100 000; 95%CI, 57-59 per 100 000; P < .001). The prevalence of HS was highest among patients aged 30 to 39 years (172 per 100 000; 95%CI, 169-275 per 100 000) compared with all other age groups (range, 15-150 per 100 000; P < .001). Adjusted HS prevalences among African American (296 per 100 000; 95%CI, 291-300 per 100 000) and biracial (218 per 100 000; 95%CI, 202-235 per 100 000) patients were more than 3-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than that among white patients (95 per 100 000; 95%CI, 94-96 per 100 000; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hidradenitis suppurativa is an uncommon, but not rare, disease in the United States that disproportionately affects female patients, young adults, and African American and biracial patients.

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