Sex and age differences in the associations between sleep behaviors and all-cause mortality in older adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

Hind A. Beydoun, May A. Beydoun, Xiaoli Chen, Jen Jen Chang, Alyssa A. Gamaldo, Shaker M. Eid, Alan B. Zonderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Our aim was to examine sex- and age-specific relationships of sleep behaviors with all-cause mortality rates. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 5288 adults (≥50 years) from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys who were followed-up for 54.9 ± 1.2 months. Sleep duration was categorized as < 7 h, 7–8 h and >8 h. Two sleep quality indices were generated through factor analyses. ‘Help-seeking behavior for sleep problems’ and ‘diagnosis with sleep disorders’ were defined as yes/no questions. Sociodemographic covariates-adjusted Cox regression models were applied to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A positive relationship was observed between long sleep and all-cause mortality rate in the overall sample (HR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.38, 2.60), among males (HR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.09), females (HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.48, 3.61) and elderly (≥65 years) people (HR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.30, 2.50). ‘Sleepiness/sleep disturbance’ (Factor I) and all-cause mortality rate were positively associated among males (HR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.45), whereas ‘poor sleep-related daytime dysfunction’ (Factor II) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.62, 0.91) were negatively associated among elderly people. Conclusions Sex- and age-specific relationships were observed between all-cause mortality rate and specific sleep behaviors among older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-151
Number of pages11
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume36
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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