Sex differences in biobehavioral responses to threat: Reply to Geary and Flinn (2002)

Shelley E. Taylor, Tara L. Gruenewald, John A. Updegraff, Brian P. Lewis, Regan A.R. Gurung, Laura Cousino Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Early theories of stress obscured differences in how men and women respond to threat. The tend- and-befriend model attempted to partially redress that oversight by identifying biological and behavioral patterns of stress responses distinctive to females, responses that are markedly social. Although men's behavior under stress may also be social, at least under certain circumstances, extending the tend- and-befriend model to men is premature and potentially flawed, from the vantage points of the underlying biology and the behavioral stress responses it may help to foster.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-753
Number of pages3
JournalPsychological Review
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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