Sex differences in executive functioning and latent herpesvirus reactivation among bereaved and nonbereaved individuals

Jasmin E. Guevara, Sarah Gilbert, Kyle W. Murdock, Raymond P. Stowe, Christopher P. Fagundes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The death of a spouse is a highly stressful event. Better executive functioning has been shown to benefit men to a greater degree than women during stress. We evaluated potential sex differences in stress and immune dysregulation among control and bereaved participants who completed a self-report measure of perceived stress, neuropsychological measures of inhibition and updating/monitoring of information in working memory, and a blood draw to measure Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) antibody titres. Moderation analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that better inhibition would be associated with less stress and immune dysregulation among male bereaved participants compared with female bereaved participants. Bereaved females demonstrated greater EBV antibody titres than bereaved males. Male bereaved participants benefited from better inhibition, as evidenced by fewer EBV antibody titres, whereas bereaved female participants did not. In the control group, males with high inhibition reported lower stress than males with low inhibition. Present study results are an important step towards identifying those at greatest risk of stress and poor health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-406
Number of pages11
JournalStress and Health
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Herpesviridae
Sex Characteristics
Viral Load
Antibodies
Spouses
Short-Term Memory
Self Report
Inhibition (Psychology)
Control Groups
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Guevara, Jasmin E. ; Gilbert, Sarah ; Murdock, Kyle W. ; Stowe, Raymond P. ; Fagundes, Christopher P. / Sex differences in executive functioning and latent herpesvirus reactivation among bereaved and nonbereaved individuals. In: Stress and Health. 2019 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 396-406.
@article{8b04f2383dc94e109231d25e8c176d9d,
title = "Sex differences in executive functioning and latent herpesvirus reactivation among bereaved and nonbereaved individuals",
abstract = "The death of a spouse is a highly stressful event. Better executive functioning has been shown to benefit men to a greater degree than women during stress. We evaluated potential sex differences in stress and immune dysregulation among control and bereaved participants who completed a self-report measure of perceived stress, neuropsychological measures of inhibition and updating/monitoring of information in working memory, and a blood draw to measure Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) antibody titres. Moderation analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that better inhibition would be associated with less stress and immune dysregulation among male bereaved participants compared with female bereaved participants. Bereaved females demonstrated greater EBV antibody titres than bereaved males. Male bereaved participants benefited from better inhibition, as evidenced by fewer EBV antibody titres, whereas bereaved female participants did not. In the control group, males with high inhibition reported lower stress than males with low inhibition. Present study results are an important step towards identifying those at greatest risk of stress and poor health.",
author = "Guevara, {Jasmin E.} and Sarah Gilbert and Murdock, {Kyle W.} and Stowe, {Raymond P.} and Fagundes, {Christopher P.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/smi.2867",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "396--406",
journal = "Stress and Health",
issn = "1532-2998",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Sex differences in executive functioning and latent herpesvirus reactivation among bereaved and nonbereaved individuals. / Guevara, Jasmin E.; Gilbert, Sarah; Murdock, Kyle W.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Fagundes, Christopher P.

In: Stress and Health, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.10.2019, p. 396-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex differences in executive functioning and latent herpesvirus reactivation among bereaved and nonbereaved individuals

AU - Guevara, Jasmin E.

AU - Gilbert, Sarah

AU - Murdock, Kyle W.

AU - Stowe, Raymond P.

AU - Fagundes, Christopher P.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - The death of a spouse is a highly stressful event. Better executive functioning has been shown to benefit men to a greater degree than women during stress. We evaluated potential sex differences in stress and immune dysregulation among control and bereaved participants who completed a self-report measure of perceived stress, neuropsychological measures of inhibition and updating/monitoring of information in working memory, and a blood draw to measure Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) antibody titres. Moderation analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that better inhibition would be associated with less stress and immune dysregulation among male bereaved participants compared with female bereaved participants. Bereaved females demonstrated greater EBV antibody titres than bereaved males. Male bereaved participants benefited from better inhibition, as evidenced by fewer EBV antibody titres, whereas bereaved female participants did not. In the control group, males with high inhibition reported lower stress than males with low inhibition. Present study results are an important step towards identifying those at greatest risk of stress and poor health.

AB - The death of a spouse is a highly stressful event. Better executive functioning has been shown to benefit men to a greater degree than women during stress. We evaluated potential sex differences in stress and immune dysregulation among control and bereaved participants who completed a self-report measure of perceived stress, neuropsychological measures of inhibition and updating/monitoring of information in working memory, and a blood draw to measure Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) antibody titres. Moderation analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that better inhibition would be associated with less stress and immune dysregulation among male bereaved participants compared with female bereaved participants. Bereaved females demonstrated greater EBV antibody titres than bereaved males. Male bereaved participants benefited from better inhibition, as evidenced by fewer EBV antibody titres, whereas bereaved female participants did not. In the control group, males with high inhibition reported lower stress than males with low inhibition. Present study results are an important step towards identifying those at greatest risk of stress and poor health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068895766&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068895766&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/smi.2867

DO - 10.1002/smi.2867

M3 - Article

C2 - 30977590

AN - SCOPUS:85068895766

VL - 35

SP - 396

EP - 406

JO - Stress and Health

JF - Stress and Health

SN - 1532-2998

IS - 4

ER -