Sex Differences in Response to a Blocked Career Pathway Among Unaccepted Medical School Applicants

Carol S. Weisman, Laura L. Morlock, Diana G. Sack, David M. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex differences in career aspirations and behavior following unsuccessful application to medical school are examined. Findings from a 1972 national study indicate that, despite similar academic qualifications and initial career aspirations, women are less persistent than men in reapplying to medical school, more likely than men to lower their educational aspirations following rejection, and less likely than men to enroll in doctoral degree programs. Much of the sex difference in aspirations and behavior may be explained by the different perceptions of rejection, types of counseling received, prior career considerations, and values of men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-208
Number of pages22
JournalWork and Occupations
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1976

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applicant
career
career aspiration
school
qualification
counseling
Sex differences
Pathway
Values
Career aspirations
Aspiration

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Weisman, Carol S. ; Morlock, Laura L. ; Sack, Diana G. ; Levine, David M. / Sex Differences in Response to a Blocked Career Pathway Among Unaccepted Medical School Applicants. In: Work and Occupations. 1976 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 187-208.
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Sex Differences in Response to a Blocked Career Pathway Among Unaccepted Medical School Applicants. / Weisman, Carol S.; Morlock, Laura L.; Sack, Diana G.; Levine, David M.

In: Work and Occupations, Vol. 3, No. 2, 01.01.1976, p. 187-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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