Sex differences in the acceptability and short-term outcomes of a web-based personalized feedback alcohol intervention for high school seniors

Diana M. Doumas, Susan Esp, Rob Turrisi, Laura Bond, Sherise Porchia, Brian Flay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite the escalation of alcohol use through high school, the majority of research on school-based alcohol interventions has been conducted with junior high students or first and second-year high school students. Preliminary research indicates a brief, web-based personalized feedback intervention developed for college students (eCHECKUP TO GO) may be a promising program for high school seniors. Although these studies demonstrate positive intervention effects, there is some evidence for greater program efficacy for females in this age group. The current study investigates sex differences in program acceptability of the eCHECKUP TO GO and its relationship to short-term alcohol outcomes among high school seniors (N = 135). Overall, the majority of students reported they found the program to be acceptable (i.e., user-friendly and useful). However, contrary to our hypothesis, results indicated that male students reported significantly higher perceptions of program acceptability than females. Although we did not find sex differences in alcohol outcomes, program user-friendliness was related to reductions in alcohol use for males. The results of this study add to the literature supporting the eCHECKUP TO GO for high school seniors and highlight the importance of program user-friendliness for males. Implications for implementing the program as a school-based intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1724-1740
Number of pages17
JournalPsychology in the Schools
Volume57
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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