Sexual coercion and victimization of college men: The role of love styles

Brenda L. Russell, Debra L. Oswald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate the role of love styles, sexual coercion, and victimization among men. Men were classified in two categories: perpetrator (either inexperienced, consensual, or coercive) and victim (never victimized, verbally victimized, physically victimized, or both verbally and physically victimized). Love styles were indicative of both perpetrators and victims of sexual coercion. Men who reported engaging in coercive strategies were more likely to endorse Ludus (game-playing love) love style, and less likely to endorse Agape (unconditional love) love style than noncoercive men. Men who reported love styles of Storge (a friendship-first attitude toward love) and Pragma (a selective, practical approach toward love) were more likely to report being victims of sexually coercive behaviors. Those men who reported being sexually victimized were also more likely to report using coercive strategies. The results can further our understanding of male victimization and usage of sexually coercive strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-285
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2002

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Coercion
Crime Victims
Love

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Sexual coercion and victimization of college men : The role of love styles. / Russell, Brenda L.; Oswald, Debra L.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.03.2002, p. 273-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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