Shear stress increases endothelial cell-membrane fluidity

Peter J. Butler, Gerard Norwich, Sheldon Weinbaum, Shu Chien

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cell-membrane fluidity modulates protein function and mobility. Blood flow-associated shear stress induces changes in endothelial cell functions, many of which may be initiated by alterations in the plasma membrane. In this study, we quantify the effects of shear stress on endothelial cell-membrane lipid-fluidity measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A confocal microscope was used for FRAP-measurements on DiI-stained bovine aortic endothelial cells in a parallel-plate flow chamber under static conditions, after a step-shear stress of 10 dynes/cm2 which was maintained for 15 minutes, and after the removal of shear stress. The DiI-diffusion coefficient (D) increased immediately and significantly from a pre-step value of 4.3±0.48×10-9 to 8.7±1.8×10-9 cm2/sec within 2 min after the initiation of shear stress and remained elevated thereafter. D returned to control values within 1 minute after cessation of shear stress. The novel measurements of shear-induced increases in membrane-fluidity provide important insight into the mechanisms of shear-induced protein modulation and mobilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume1
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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  • Cite this

    Butler, P. J., Norwich, G., Weinbaum, S., & Chien, S. (1999). Shear stress increases endothelial cell-membrane fluidity. In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings (Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings; Vol. 1). IEEE.