SHIELDING-EFFECTIVENESS CHARACTERIZATION FOR HIGHLY RESONANT STRUCTURES APPLICABLE TO SYSTEM DESIGN.

Karl S. Kunz, H. Gerald Hudson, James K. Breakall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental measurements and computational predictions are made of the transient interior response of a simple, 1-m-high, cylindrical test object at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The measurements were performed at the Transient Range Facility and the computations were made with the three-dimensional time-domain finite-difference code G3DXL3. Inside the test object, wires were run at different locations with a mix of short and open terminations. Cable currents at the base of the wires were measured for several geometries and compared with code predictions. A method of characterizing and understanding the coupling process from a shielding-effectiveness (SE) standpoint that properly accounts for internal cavity responses is described. This method can be used to develop a large array of shielding-effectiveness functions useful to system designers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-29
Number of pages12
JournalIEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
VolumeEMC-28
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 1986

Fingerprint

systems engineering
Shielding
shielding
ranges (facilities)
Systems analysis
wire
Wire
predictions
cables
Cables
cavities
Geometry
geometry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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SHIELDING-EFFECTIVENESS CHARACTERIZATION FOR HIGHLY RESONANT STRUCTURES APPLICABLE TO SYSTEM DESIGN. / Kunz, Karl S.; Hudson, H. Gerald; Breakall, James K.

In: IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Vol. EMC-28, No. 1, 01.02.1986, p. 18-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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