Short Nighttime Sleep Duration and High Number of Nighttime Awakenings Explain Increases in Gestational Weight Gain and Decreases in Physical Activity but Not Energy Intake among Pregnant Women with Overweight/Obesity

Abigail M Pauley, Emily E Hohman, Krista S Leonard, Penghong Guo, Katherine M McNitt, Daniel E Rivera, Jennifer S Savage, Danielle Symons Downs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pregnant women are at a high risk for experiencing sleep disturbances, excess energy intake, low physical activity, and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). Scant research has examined how sleep behaviors influence energy intake, physical activity, and GWG over the course of pregnancy. This study conducted secondary analyses from the Healthy Mom Zone Study to examine between- and within-person effects of weekly sleep behaviors on energy intake, physical activity, and GWG in pregnant women with overweight/obesity (PW-OW/OB) participating in an adaptive intervention to manage GWG. The overall sample of N = 24 (M age = 30.6 years, SD = 3.2) had an average nighttime sleep duration of 7.2 h/night. In the total sample, there was a significant between-person effect of nighttime awakenings on physical activity; women with >1 weekly nighttime awakening expended 167.56 less physical activity kcals than women with <1 nighttime awakening. A significant within-person effect was also found for GWG such that for every increase in one weekly nighttime awakening there was a 0.76 pound increase in GWG. There was also a significant within-person effect for study group assignment; study group appeared to moderate the effect of nighttime awakenings on GWG such that for every one increase in weekly nighttime awakening, the control group gained 0.20 pounds more than the intervention group. There were no significant between- or within-person effects of sleep behaviors on energy intake. These findings illustrate an important need to consider the influence of sleep behaviors on prenatal physical activity and GWG in PW-OW/OB. Future studies may consider intervention strategies to reduce prenatal nighttime awakenings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-501
Number of pages15
JournalClocks & sleep
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 14 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Short Nighttime Sleep Duration and High Number of Nighttime Awakenings Explain Increases in Gestational Weight Gain and Decreases in Physical Activity but Not Energy Intake among Pregnant Women with Overweight/Obesity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this