Significance of Echocardiographically Detected Central Venous Catheter Tip–Associated Thrombi

Jeffrey Forris Beecham Chick, Shilpa N. Reddy, Ruchika D. Bhatt, Benjamin J. Shin, James N. Kirkpatrick, Scott O. Trerotola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To explore significance, management, and outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) tip–associated thrombi incidentally detected on echocardiography. Materials and Methods Echocardiogram data from all patients with CVCs from October 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed (N = 170). Patients with CVC tip–associated thrombi were selected (n = 49). Echocardiograms were reviewed for ejection fraction, presence of patent foramen ovale (PFO), presence of other intracardiac shunts, and mean thrombus size. Management decisions, thrombus extension, pulmonary embolism, paradoxical emboli, and stroke within 3 months were recorded. Results Mean thrombus size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–5.7 cm). Of patients with thrombi, 11 (22%) were already on anticoagulation, and there was no change in management. Anticoagulation was started without complications in 17 (35%) patients, the catheter was removed in 4 (8%) patients, and no new treatment was initiated in 17 (35%) patients. Of these 17 patients, 16 (94%) developed no complications. One (6%) patient with a PFO and right-to-left shunt experienced a stroke before PFO closure. After surgical closure of the PFO, the same patient developed catheter tip–associated thrombus without complication. There were no pulmonary emboli, strokes, or other detected embolic phenomena. Conclusions In this sample with CVC tip–associated thrombi but without PFO or other intracardiac shunts, no embolic or other complications were detected, regardless of anticoagulation status. These data suggest a benign course for such thrombi and that anticoagulation, catheter removal, thrombectomy, and thrombolysis may be unnecessary when catheter tip–associated thrombi are incidentally detected on echocardiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1872-1877
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Central Venous Catheters
Thrombosis
Patent Foramen Ovale
Catheters
Stroke
Embolism
Echocardiography
Thrombectomy
Pulmonary Embolism
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham ; Reddy, Shilpa N. ; Bhatt, Ruchika D. ; Shin, Benjamin J. ; Kirkpatrick, James N. ; Trerotola, Scott O. / Significance of Echocardiographically Detected Central Venous Catheter Tip–Associated Thrombi. In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. 2016 ; Vol. 27, No. 12. pp. 1872-1877.
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abstract = "Purpose To explore significance, management, and outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) tip–associated thrombi incidentally detected on echocardiography. Materials and Methods Echocardiogram data from all patients with CVCs from October 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed (N = 170). Patients with CVC tip–associated thrombi were selected (n = 49). Echocardiograms were reviewed for ejection fraction, presence of patent foramen ovale (PFO), presence of other intracardiac shunts, and mean thrombus size. Management decisions, thrombus extension, pulmonary embolism, paradoxical emboli, and stroke within 3 months were recorded. Results Mean thrombus size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–5.7 cm). Of patients with thrombi, 11 (22{\%}) were already on anticoagulation, and there was no change in management. Anticoagulation was started without complications in 17 (35{\%}) patients, the catheter was removed in 4 (8{\%}) patients, and no new treatment was initiated in 17 (35{\%}) patients. Of these 17 patients, 16 (94{\%}) developed no complications. One (6{\%}) patient with a PFO and right-to-left shunt experienced a stroke before PFO closure. After surgical closure of the PFO, the same patient developed catheter tip–associated thrombus without complication. There were no pulmonary emboli, strokes, or other detected embolic phenomena. Conclusions In this sample with CVC tip–associated thrombi but without PFO or other intracardiac shunts, no embolic or other complications were detected, regardless of anticoagulation status. These data suggest a benign course for such thrombi and that anticoagulation, catheter removal, thrombectomy, and thrombolysis may be unnecessary when catheter tip–associated thrombi are incidentally detected on echocardiography.",
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Significance of Echocardiographically Detected Central Venous Catheter Tip–Associated Thrombi. / Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Reddy, Shilpa N.; Bhatt, Ruchika D.; Shin, Benjamin J.; Kirkpatrick, James N.; Trerotola, Scott O.

In: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 27, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1872-1877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham

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AU - Shin, Benjamin J.

AU - Kirkpatrick, James N.

AU - Trerotola, Scott O.

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N2 - Purpose To explore significance, management, and outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) tip–associated thrombi incidentally detected on echocardiography. Materials and Methods Echocardiogram data from all patients with CVCs from October 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed (N = 170). Patients with CVC tip–associated thrombi were selected (n = 49). Echocardiograms were reviewed for ejection fraction, presence of patent foramen ovale (PFO), presence of other intracardiac shunts, and mean thrombus size. Management decisions, thrombus extension, pulmonary embolism, paradoxical emboli, and stroke within 3 months were recorded. Results Mean thrombus size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–5.7 cm). Of patients with thrombi, 11 (22%) were already on anticoagulation, and there was no change in management. Anticoagulation was started without complications in 17 (35%) patients, the catheter was removed in 4 (8%) patients, and no new treatment was initiated in 17 (35%) patients. Of these 17 patients, 16 (94%) developed no complications. One (6%) patient with a PFO and right-to-left shunt experienced a stroke before PFO closure. After surgical closure of the PFO, the same patient developed catheter tip–associated thrombus without complication. There were no pulmonary emboli, strokes, or other detected embolic phenomena. Conclusions In this sample with CVC tip–associated thrombi but without PFO or other intracardiac shunts, no embolic or other complications were detected, regardless of anticoagulation status. These data suggest a benign course for such thrombi and that anticoagulation, catheter removal, thrombectomy, and thrombolysis may be unnecessary when catheter tip–associated thrombi are incidentally detected on echocardiography.

AB - Purpose To explore significance, management, and outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) tip–associated thrombi incidentally detected on echocardiography. Materials and Methods Echocardiogram data from all patients with CVCs from October 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed (N = 170). Patients with CVC tip–associated thrombi were selected (n = 49). Echocardiograms were reviewed for ejection fraction, presence of patent foramen ovale (PFO), presence of other intracardiac shunts, and mean thrombus size. Management decisions, thrombus extension, pulmonary embolism, paradoxical emboli, and stroke within 3 months were recorded. Results Mean thrombus size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–5.7 cm). Of patients with thrombi, 11 (22%) were already on anticoagulation, and there was no change in management. Anticoagulation was started without complications in 17 (35%) patients, the catheter was removed in 4 (8%) patients, and no new treatment was initiated in 17 (35%) patients. Of these 17 patients, 16 (94%) developed no complications. One (6%) patient with a PFO and right-to-left shunt experienced a stroke before PFO closure. After surgical closure of the PFO, the same patient developed catheter tip–associated thrombus without complication. There were no pulmonary emboli, strokes, or other detected embolic phenomena. Conclusions In this sample with CVC tip–associated thrombi but without PFO or other intracardiac shunts, no embolic or other complications were detected, regardless of anticoagulation status. These data suggest a benign course for such thrombi and that anticoagulation, catheter removal, thrombectomy, and thrombolysis may be unnecessary when catheter tip–associated thrombi are incidentally detected on echocardiography.

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