Significant activity of single agent vinorelbine against small-cell cancer of the bladder as second line chemotherapy: A case series and review of the literature

Rayford R. June, David W. Dougherty, Carl T. Reese, Lewis E. Harpster, Salee L. Hoffman, Joseph J. Drabick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely uncommon form of urologic malignancy, accounting for less that 1% of new cases of bladder cancer. It is an aggressive malignancy which, like its pulmonary counterpart, tends to spread with distant metastases. This malignancy is generally chemotherapy and radiotherapy sensitive. Metastatic disease is typically treated with regimens active against small-cell carcinoma of the lung, such as cisplatin and etoposide. There are no data regarding second-line treatment of this cancer. We report our experience in 3 patients using the second generation vinca alkaloid, vinorelbine, in refractory metastatic small-cell carcinoma of the bladder. These 3 patients had extensive prior therapy but all 3 responded to weekly vinorelbine, with a complete response (CR) in 1, near CR in the second, and partial response in the third. Of note, the patient who sustained a CR has remained without disease and with excellent quality of life for nearly 4 years since starting vinorelbine. Indeed, the therapy was very well tolerated in all 3 patients with grade 2 cytopenia being the only toxicity. We conclude that vinorelbine is well tolerated and has activity in this case series in the second-line treatment of metastatic small-cell carcinoma of the bladder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-195
Number of pages4
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Urology

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