Similarity mapping in spoken word recognition

Cynthia M. Connine, Debra Titone, Thomas Deelman, Dawn Blasko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Five phoneme monitoring experiments are reported that investigate the relationship between the degree of lexical activation (based on similarity of the input to a real word) and phoneme perception. Experiment 1 showed that phoneme monitoring detection times increased as similarity of the carrier to a real word decreased. Experiment 2 replicated these results with a set of two syllable stimuli. Experiment 4 extended the results of Experiments 1 and 2 to a new phoneme. Two additional control experiments (Experiments 3 and 5) were conducted with truncated stimuli where lexical contributions were removed. The results are discussed in terms of the architectural relationship between the acoustic-phonetic input, form-based lexical levels, and semantic levels of representation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-480
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1997

Fingerprint

Phonetics
Semantics
Acoustics
experiment
Experiments
stimulus
monitoring
Speech analysis
Monitoring
Recognition (Psychology)
Spoken Word Recognition
Experiment
phonetics
acoustics
activation
Chemical activation
semantics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Connine, Cynthia M. ; Titone, Debra ; Deelman, Thomas ; Blasko, Dawn. / Similarity mapping in spoken word recognition. In: Journal of Memory and Language. 1997 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 463-480.
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Similarity mapping in spoken word recognition. / Connine, Cynthia M.; Titone, Debra; Deelman, Thomas; Blasko, Dawn.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.11.1997, p. 463-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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