Simple telemedicine for developing regions: Camera phones and paper-based microfluidic devices for real-time, off-site diagnosis

Andres W. Martinez, Scott T. Phillips, Emanuel Carrilho, Samuel W. Thomas, Hayat Sindi, George M. Whitesides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

956 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article describes a prototype system for quantifying bioassays and for exchanging the results of the assays digitally with physicians located off-site. The system uses paper-based microfluidic devices for running multiple assays simultaneously, camera phones or portable scanners for digitizing the intensity of color associated with each colorimetric assay, and established communications infrastructure for transferring the digital information from the assay site to an off-site laboratory for analysis by a trained medical professional; the diagnosis then can be returned directly to the healthcare provider in the field. The microfluidic devices were fabricated in paper using photolithography and were functionalized with reagents for colorimetric assays. The results of the assays were quantified by comparing the intensities of the color developed in each assay with those of calibration curves. An example of this system quantified clinically relevant concentrations of glucose and protein in artificial urine. The combination of patterned paper, a portable method for obtaining digital images, and a method for exchanging results of the assays with off-site diagnosticians offers new opportunities for inexpensive monitoring of health, especially in situations that require physicians to travel to patients (e.g., in the developing world, in emergency management, and during field operations by the military) to obtain diagnostic information that might be obtained more effectively by less valuable personnel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3699-3707
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical chemistry
Volume80
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2008

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Telemedicine
Microfluidics
Assays
Cameras
Color
Bioassay
Photolithography
Health
Calibration
Personnel
Glucose
Monitoring
Communication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Martinez, A. W., Phillips, S. T., Carrilho, E., Thomas, S. W., Sindi, H., & Whitesides, G. M. (2008). Simple telemedicine for developing regions: Camera phones and paper-based microfluidic devices for real-time, off-site diagnosis. Analytical chemistry, 80(10), 3699-3707. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac800112r
Martinez, Andres W. ; Phillips, Scott T. ; Carrilho, Emanuel ; Thomas, Samuel W. ; Sindi, Hayat ; Whitesides, George M. / Simple telemedicine for developing regions : Camera phones and paper-based microfluidic devices for real-time, off-site diagnosis. In: Analytical chemistry. 2008 ; Vol. 80, No. 10. pp. 3699-3707.
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Martinez, AW, Phillips, ST, Carrilho, E, Thomas, SW, Sindi, H & Whitesides, GM 2008, 'Simple telemedicine for developing regions: Camera phones and paper-based microfluidic devices for real-time, off-site diagnosis', Analytical chemistry, vol. 80, no. 10, pp. 3699-3707. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac800112r

Simple telemedicine for developing regions : Camera phones and paper-based microfluidic devices for real-time, off-site diagnosis. / Martinez, Andres W.; Phillips, Scott T.; Carrilho, Emanuel; Thomas, Samuel W.; Sindi, Hayat; Whitesides, George M.

In: Analytical chemistry, Vol. 80, No. 10, 15.05.2008, p. 3699-3707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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