Simulating situated work

Amy R. Pritchett, So Young Kim, Suresh K. Kannan, Karen Feigh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes computational models of situated work in complex, heterogeneous dynamic systems that include humans, physical systems, computer agents and regulatory requirements, using aviation as the domain being examined but highlighting modeling principles generalizable to other domains. Work is defined formally here as purposeful activity acting on, and responding to, the environment as required by the situation. This work is performed by a team of automated and human agents, and involves both cognitive and physical activity. At its most atomic, work may be represented as actions that evaluate the current situation, and then act on the environment, as well as 'teamwork' actions and 'decision actions' whereby agents evaluate the situation to select the appropriate sets of actions (i.e. strategies). Work is thus a response to the situation, with strategies chosen in response to the physical environment, the allocation of responsibility within the team; and agent status including expertise, the demands on the agent, and resources available to the agent such as time and information. In addition, a description of the structures inherent to work is also used to organize the actions into an abstraction hierarchy: at the bottom are the resources and actions, but at higher levels of abstraction more aggregate functions provide descriptions that relate the detailed actions to the specific goals of the work. Historically, such models have been used qualitatively, but had a disconnect from computational modeling of situated behavior. Therefore, this paper details how they may be dynamically simulated to examine how work can be studied dynamically as situated within a dynamic environment driving, and responding to, agent activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011
Pages66-73
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 23 2011
Event2011 IEEE 1st International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011 - Miami Beach, FL, United States
Duration: Feb 21 2011Feb 24 2011

Publication series

Name2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011

Other

Other2011 IEEE 1st International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011
CountryUnited States
CityMiami Beach, FL
Period2/21/112/24/11

Fingerprint

Aviation
Computer Systems
Resources
Responsibility
Modeling
Computational modeling
Computational model
Team work
Dynamic environment
Expertise
Physical environment
Dynamic systems
Physical activity
Computer systems

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Decision Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Pritchett, A. R., Kim, S. Y., Kannan, S. K., & Feigh, K. (2011). Simulating situated work. In 2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011 (pp. 66-73). [5753756] (2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/COGSIMA.2011.5753756
Pritchett, Amy R. ; Kim, So Young ; Kannan, Suresh K. ; Feigh, Karen. / Simulating situated work. 2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011. 2011. pp. 66-73 (2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011).
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Pritchett, AR, Kim, SY, Kannan, SK & Feigh, K 2011, Simulating situated work. in 2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011., 5753756, 2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011, pp. 66-73, 2011 IEEE 1st International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011, Miami Beach, FL, United States, 2/21/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/COGSIMA.2011.5753756

Simulating situated work. / Pritchett, Amy R.; Kim, So Young; Kannan, Suresh K.; Feigh, Karen.

2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011. 2011. p. 66-73 5753756 (2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Pritchett AR, Kim SY, Kannan SK, Feigh K. Simulating situated work. In 2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011. 2011. p. 66-73. 5753756. (2011 IEEE International Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Cognitive Methods in Situation Awareness and Decision Support, CogSIMA 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/COGSIMA.2011.5753756