Simultaneous measurement of acoustic and streaming velocities in a standing wave using laser Doppler anemometry

Michael W. Thompson, Anthony A. Atchley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) with burst spectrum analysis (BSA) is used to study the acoustic streaming generated in a cylindrical standing-wave resonator filled with air. The air column is driven sinusoidally at a frequency of approximately 310 Hz and the resultant acoustic-velocity amplitudes are less than 1.3 m/s at the velocity antinodes. The axial component of fluid velocity is measured along the resonator axis, across the diameter, and as a function of acoustic amplitude. The velocity signals are postprocessed using the Fourier averaging method [Sonnenberger et al., Exp. Fluids 28, 217-224 (2000)]. Equations are derived for determining the uncertainties in the resultant Fourier coefficients. The time-averaged velocity-signal components are seen to be contaminated by significant errors due to the LDA/BSA system. In order to avoid these errors, the Lagrangian streaming velocities are determined using the time-harmonic signal components and the arrival times of the velocity samples. The observed Lagrangian streaming velocities are consistent with Rott's theory [N. Rott, Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 25, 417-421 (1974)], indicating that the dependence of viscosity on temperature is important. The onset of streaming is observed to occur within approximately 5 s after switching on the acoustic field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1828-1838
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume117
Issue number4 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

Fingerprint

acoustic streaming
acoustic velocity
velocity measurement
standing waves
lasers
spectrum analysis
bursts
resonators
antinodes
acoustics
fluids
air
Acoustics
Streaming
Laser Anemometry
Waves
arrivals
viscosity
harmonics
coefficients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

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title = "Simultaneous measurement of acoustic and streaming velocities in a standing wave using laser Doppler anemometry",
abstract = "Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) with burst spectrum analysis (BSA) is used to study the acoustic streaming generated in a cylindrical standing-wave resonator filled with air. The air column is driven sinusoidally at a frequency of approximately 310 Hz and the resultant acoustic-velocity amplitudes are less than 1.3 m/s at the velocity antinodes. The axial component of fluid velocity is measured along the resonator axis, across the diameter, and as a function of acoustic amplitude. The velocity signals are postprocessed using the Fourier averaging method [Sonnenberger et al., Exp. Fluids 28, 217-224 (2000)]. Equations are derived for determining the uncertainties in the resultant Fourier coefficients. The time-averaged velocity-signal components are seen to be contaminated by significant errors due to the LDA/BSA system. In order to avoid these errors, the Lagrangian streaming velocities are determined using the time-harmonic signal components and the arrival times of the velocity samples. The observed Lagrangian streaming velocities are consistent with Rott's theory [N. Rott, Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 25, 417-421 (1974)], indicating that the dependence of viscosity on temperature is important. The onset of streaming is observed to occur within approximately 5 s after switching on the acoustic field.",
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Simultaneous measurement of acoustic and streaming velocities in a standing wave using laser Doppler anemometry. / Thompson, Michael W.; Atchley, Anthony A.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 117, No. 4 I, 01.04.2005, p. 1828-1838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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