Sit, down, stay! The comparison of virtual, robotic, and live entities for human-animal and human-technology interactions

Heather C. Lum, Grace E. Waldfogle, Nicholas J. Bowser, Richard L. Greatbatch

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The advancement of technology has made an immense impact on our society today, explicitly using games as a teaching and training tool. In the current study, researchers examined the perceptual differences between a live, video game, and robotic pet. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three entities and asked to interact with the entity in two different scenarios; free-play and specific training commands. Researchers measured the perceived workload differences for each condition. There are individual differences in perceived mental demand, temporal demand, and performance across the three entity types. The result of this research focuses on comparing individual differences and how they can contribute to or hinder learning and interaction in a live, game based, or robotics scenario. This has important implications for the domain of pet training as well as human-animal and human-technology interactions as a whole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages791-795
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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