Size matters just not in the way that you think: Myths surrounding sample size requirements for statistical analyses

Scott Tonidandel, Eleanor B. Williams, James M. Lebreton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

When designing a new study, researchers frequently must answer the critical question, “How many participants do I need?” The adage “the more participants the better” does not provide a concrete suggestion for researchers to use as a guidepost. Numerous rules of thumb have been generated and used as simple heuristics by researchers when determining necessary sample sizes. Often, these rules of thumb specify minimum sample sizes for particular analyses (e.g., N > 100 for multiple regression) or they specify a ratio of the number of participants needed relative to other aspects of the analyses (e.g., ratio of # of participants to # of variables).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMore Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages162-183
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9781135039431
ISBN (Print)9780415838986
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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    Tonidandel, S., Williams, E. B., & Lebreton, J. M. (2014). Size matters just not in the way that you think: Myths surrounding sample size requirements for statistical analyses. In More Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends (pp. 162-183). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203775851-15