Slavery, the civil war era, and African American representation in U.S. history: An analysis of four states' academic standards

Carl B. Anderson, Scott Alan Metzger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is a mixed-methods text analysis of African American representation within K-12 U.S. History content standards treating the revolutionary era, the early U.S. republic, the Civil War era, and Reconstruction. The states included in the analysis are Michigan, New Jersey, South Carolina, and Virginia. The analysis finds that the reviewed standards devote considerable space to African Americans during the formation and development of the United States, but the nature of this inclusion is typically superficial and tends to trivialize the systemic institutional contexts of slavery and racial hierarchy. The standards also typically do not engage students in cognitively demanding historical thinking processes and avoid engaging students in critical analysis of historical racial tensions in order to promote a consensus narrative of social cohesion and national development. While the standards cannot be faulted on the grounds of numeric inclusion of African American names and events, they do not substantively promote critical thinking about the construction of racialized identities and their role in the political, economic, social, and cultural contexts of U.S. history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-415
Number of pages23
JournalTheory and Research in Social Education
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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slavery
civil war
history
inclusion
text analysis
national development
social cohesion
republic
reconstruction
student
narrative
American
event
economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Slavery, the civil war era, and African American representation in U.S. history : An analysis of four states' academic standards. / Anderson, Carl B.; Metzger, Scott Alan.

In: Theory and Research in Social Education, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.12.2011, p. 393-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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