Sleep and CKD in Chinese adults: A cross-sectional study

Junjuan Li, Zhe Huang, Jinhong Hou, Amy M. Sawyer, Zhijun Wu, Jianfang Cai, Gary Curhan, Shouling Wu, Xiang Gao

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11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and objectives To assess the association between self-reported sleep duration and quality and odds of having CKD in Chinese adults on the basis of a community study. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this cross-sectional study, we included 11,040 Chinese adults who participated in an ongoing prospective study, the Kailuan cohort. Survey questionnaire items addressed insomnia, daytime sleepiness, snoring, and sleep duration during their 2012 interview. Overall sleep quality was evaluated by summarizing these four sleep parameters. Fasting blood samples and single random midstream morning urine samples were collected in 2012 and analyzed for serum creatinine and proteinuria. CKD was defined by eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73m2 or proteinuria >300mg/dl. We also examined those at high or very high risk of having CKD, on the basis of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes recommendations. The association between sleep quality and CKD was assessed using logistic regression model. Results Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher likelihood of being high or very high risk for CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.30 to 5.59 comparing two extreme categories; P trend<0.01), but not overall CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 2.80 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.46), after adjusting for potential confounders. Specifically, individuals with worse sleep quality were more likely to have proteinuria (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.95; 95%confidence interval, 1.03 to 3.67 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.02), rather than lower eGFR level (multiadjusted mean eGFR levels were 96.4 and 93.6 ml/min per 1.73m2 in the two extreme sleep categories, respectively; P trend=0.13). However, there was no statistically significant association between individual sleep parameters and CKD status. Conclusions Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher odds of being high or very high risk for CKD and proteinuria in Chinese adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-892
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Li, J., Huang, Z., Hou, J., Sawyer, A. M., Wu, Z., Cai, J., Curhan, G., Wu, S., & Gao, X. (2017). Sleep and CKD in Chinese adults: A cross-sectional study. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 12(6), 885-892. https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.09270816