Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings

C. R. Soldatos, A. Vela-Bueno, Edward Bixler, P. K. Schweitzer, A. Kales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is the first controlled study to show a lack of relation between a positive history of sleepwalking or night terrors in adults and daytime EEG abnormalities. We recorded a standard clinical EEG on 35 adult sleepwalkers (SW), 35 adult night terror patients (NT), and 35 control subjects (CS). Threesubjects in the SW group showed abnormalities: one during both the resting record (RR) and hyperventilation (HV), and two only during HV. None in the NT group showed any EEG abnormality. Two control subjects showed abnormalities of both RR and HV, and a third only during HV. The number of abnormal EEGs within each group was limited, and the three groups did not significantly differ from one another. Our results suggest that the daytime clinical EEG is of limited value in evaluating adults with the primary complaint of sleepwalking or night terrors. However, further all-night sleep EEG studies utilizing clinical montage are needed to investigate the temporal relationship of sleepwalking and night terror events to possible EEG abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-139
Number of pages4
JournalClinical EEG and Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

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Night Terrors
Somnambulism
Electroencephalography
Hyperventilation
Sleep

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Soldatos, C. R., Vela-Bueno, A., Bixler, E., Schweitzer, P. K., & Kales, A. (1980). Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 11(3), 136-139. https://doi.org/10.1177/155005948001100307
Soldatos, C. R. ; Vela-Bueno, A. ; Bixler, Edward ; Schweitzer, P. K. ; Kales, A. / Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings. In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 1980 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 136-139.
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Soldatos, CR, Vela-Bueno, A, Bixler, E, Schweitzer, PK & Kales, A 1980, 'Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings', Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 136-139. https://doi.org/10.1177/155005948001100307

Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings. / Soldatos, C. R.; Vela-Bueno, A.; Bixler, Edward; Schweitzer, P. K.; Kales, A.

In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.01.1980, p. 136-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Soldatos CR, Vela-Bueno A, Bixler E, Schweitzer PK, Kales A. Sleepwalking and Night Terrors in Adulthood Clinical EEG Findings. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience. 1980 Jan 1;11(3):136-139. https://doi.org/10.1177/155005948001100307