Smart materials for turbomachinery quieting

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

As part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SAMPSON (Smart Aircraft and Marine Projects Demonstration) program, a team has been developing and testing the use of smart materials for quieting turbomachinery. The team is composed of representatives from Pennsylvania State University, General Dynamics Electric Boat, GTE BBN Technologies, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Four concepts for quieting were proposed and wind tunnel testing, water tunnel testing, as well as computational fluid dynamic analysis were performed to down select two of the concepts for further consideration: protuberance and gap control. The wind tunnel testing was performed to determine the optimum shape of the protuberance. Water tunnel testing was performed at Pennsylvania State University/Applied Research Laboratory to establish the performance of the protuberance and gap control elements. Piezoelectric inchworm actuators, developed by Pennsylvania State University/Center for Acoustics and Vibration, were utilized for the evaluation of the two concepts. GTE BBN Technologies developed the control system simulation for the ultimate concept, and General Dynamics Electric Boat was responsible for hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic analysis. Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division performed hydrodynamic analysis and developed the rotary component designs for the water tunnel test fixture. Successful testing in the twelve-inch diameter water tunnel at PSU/ARL demonstrated superior performance with the gap control concept over the protuberance control concept, and efforts are on going to develop the final large scale demonstration. This paper summarizes the results of these activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-94
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3991
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Turbomachinery
turbomachinery
Smart Materials
smart materials
Intelligent materials
protuberances
hydraulic test tunnels
Tunnel
Testing
Wind tunnels
warfare
Water
Tunnels
Wind Tunnel
Military operations
boats
Boats
wind tunnels
division
water tunnel tests

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

@article{5b7352b522884399ae5ec3499075bea4,
title = "Smart materials for turbomachinery quieting",
abstract = "As part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SAMPSON (Smart Aircraft and Marine Projects Demonstration) program, a team has been developing and testing the use of smart materials for quieting turbomachinery. The team is composed of representatives from Pennsylvania State University, General Dynamics Electric Boat, GTE BBN Technologies, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Four concepts for quieting were proposed and wind tunnel testing, water tunnel testing, as well as computational fluid dynamic analysis were performed to down select two of the concepts for further consideration: protuberance and gap control. The wind tunnel testing was performed to determine the optimum shape of the protuberance. Water tunnel testing was performed at Pennsylvania State University/Applied Research Laboratory to establish the performance of the protuberance and gap control elements. Piezoelectric inchworm actuators, developed by Pennsylvania State University/Center for Acoustics and Vibration, were utilized for the evaluation of the two concepts. GTE BBN Technologies developed the control system simulation for the ultimate concept, and General Dynamics Electric Boat was responsible for hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic analysis. Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division performed hydrodynamic analysis and developed the rotary component designs for the water tunnel test fixture. Successful testing in the twelve-inch diameter water tunnel at PSU/ARL demonstrated superior performance with the gap control concept over the protuberance control concept, and efforts are on going to develop the final large scale demonstration. This paper summarizes the results of these activities.",
author = "Jonson, {Michael Lester} and Lysak, {Peter Daniel} and Willits, {Steven M.}",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3991",
pages = "86--94",
journal = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
issn = "0277-786X",
publisher = "SPIE",

}

Smart materials for turbomachinery quieting. / Jonson, Michael Lester; Lysak, Peter Daniel; Willits, Steven M.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 3991, 01.01.2000, p. 86-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smart materials for turbomachinery quieting

AU - Jonson, Michael Lester

AU - Lysak, Peter Daniel

AU - Willits, Steven M.

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - As part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SAMPSON (Smart Aircraft and Marine Projects Demonstration) program, a team has been developing and testing the use of smart materials for quieting turbomachinery. The team is composed of representatives from Pennsylvania State University, General Dynamics Electric Boat, GTE BBN Technologies, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Four concepts for quieting were proposed and wind tunnel testing, water tunnel testing, as well as computational fluid dynamic analysis were performed to down select two of the concepts for further consideration: protuberance and gap control. The wind tunnel testing was performed to determine the optimum shape of the protuberance. Water tunnel testing was performed at Pennsylvania State University/Applied Research Laboratory to establish the performance of the protuberance and gap control elements. Piezoelectric inchworm actuators, developed by Pennsylvania State University/Center for Acoustics and Vibration, were utilized for the evaluation of the two concepts. GTE BBN Technologies developed the control system simulation for the ultimate concept, and General Dynamics Electric Boat was responsible for hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic analysis. Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division performed hydrodynamic analysis and developed the rotary component designs for the water tunnel test fixture. Successful testing in the twelve-inch diameter water tunnel at PSU/ARL demonstrated superior performance with the gap control concept over the protuberance control concept, and efforts are on going to develop the final large scale demonstration. This paper summarizes the results of these activities.

AB - As part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) SAMPSON (Smart Aircraft and Marine Projects Demonstration) program, a team has been developing and testing the use of smart materials for quieting turbomachinery. The team is composed of representatives from Pennsylvania State University, General Dynamics Electric Boat, GTE BBN Technologies, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Four concepts for quieting were proposed and wind tunnel testing, water tunnel testing, as well as computational fluid dynamic analysis were performed to down select two of the concepts for further consideration: protuberance and gap control. The wind tunnel testing was performed to determine the optimum shape of the protuberance. Water tunnel testing was performed at Pennsylvania State University/Applied Research Laboratory to establish the performance of the protuberance and gap control elements. Piezoelectric inchworm actuators, developed by Pennsylvania State University/Center for Acoustics and Vibration, were utilized for the evaluation of the two concepts. GTE BBN Technologies developed the control system simulation for the ultimate concept, and General Dynamics Electric Boat was responsible for hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic analysis. Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division performed hydrodynamic analysis and developed the rotary component designs for the water tunnel test fixture. Successful testing in the twelve-inch diameter water tunnel at PSU/ARL demonstrated superior performance with the gap control concept over the protuberance control concept, and efforts are on going to develop the final large scale demonstration. This paper summarizes the results of these activities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033691391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033691391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference article

VL - 3991

SP - 86

EP - 94

JO - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

JF - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

SN - 0277-786X

ER -