Smoking status and the human dopamine transporter variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism: Failure to replicate and finding that never-smokers may be different

David J. Vandenbergh, Christina J. Bennett, Michael D. Grant, Andrew A. Strasser, Richard O'Connor, Rebecca L. Stauffer, George P. Vogler, Lynn T. Kozlowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cigarette smoking, like many addictive behaviors, has been shown to have a genetic component. The dopamine transporter (DA7) gene (SLC6A3) encodes a protein that regulates synaptic levels of dopamine in the brain and is a candidate gene for addictive behaviors. We have collected smoking information from a national probability sample of 3383 adult volunteers contacted via a random-digit dialing telephone interview. A subset of individuals provided DNA from cheek swabs returned via the mail for subsequent genetic analysis of self-reported smoking behavior. DNA samples were genotyped at a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in the 3′-untranslated region of the DAT gene. If we classify smokers as non- (<100 cigarettes), former and current, we fail to replicate both Lerman et al. (Health Psychology 18:14-20, 1999) and Sabol et al. (Health Psychology 18:7-13, 1999) and support the absence of effects found by Jorm et al. (American Journal of Medical Genetics (Neuropsychiatric Genetics) 96:331-334, 2000). When we distinguish between never-smokers (no cigarettes ever) and non-smokers (1-99 in lifetime), we find a reliable trend essentially in the opposite direction from Lerman et al. (1999), with the 10-copy allele being more frequent in never-smokers. Biobehavioral research on cigarette smoking should distinguish between never- and non-smokers. We have also developed an improved set of polymerase chain reaction conditions to increase the frequency of successful amplification of DAT's VNTR, which is a long, G+C-rich repeat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-340
Number of pages8
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

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Minisatellite Repeats
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Smoking
Addictive Behavior
Behavioral Medicine
Tobacco Products
Genes
Sampling Studies
Cheek
DNA
Medical Genetics
Postal Service
3' Untranslated Regions
Volunteers
Dopamine
Alleles
Interviews
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Brain
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Vandenbergh, David J. ; Bennett, Christina J. ; Grant, Michael D. ; Strasser, Andrew A. ; O'Connor, Richard ; Stauffer, Rebecca L. ; Vogler, George P. ; Kozlowski, Lynn T. / Smoking status and the human dopamine transporter variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism : Failure to replicate and finding that never-smokers may be different. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2002 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 333-340.
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Smoking status and the human dopamine transporter variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism : Failure to replicate and finding that never-smokers may be different. / Vandenbergh, David J.; Bennett, Christina J.; Grant, Michael D.; Strasser, Andrew A.; O'Connor, Richard; Stauffer, Rebecca L.; Vogler, George P.; Kozlowski, Lynn T.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.08.2002, p. 333-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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