So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance

Matthew D. Marraffino, Heather, Heather C. Lum, Valerie K. Sims, Matthew G. Chin, Shane E. Halse, Bradley Lippman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A plethora of research has examined video games in the context of training and violence. However, little has been done in examining the individual differences that may exist as it relates to success or failure during game play. Few studies have focused on empirically testing usability and performance issues specifically related to sports games. In this study, a football simulation video game was used to investigate how video game experience interacts with football knowledge in explaining performance within the game. Football video game simulations are a complicated game that appears best played when the user has both knowledge of football and experience playing video games. This study has implications for the individual differences that dictate performance within games.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
Pages1516-1519
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 19 2011Sep 23 2011

Other

Other55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period9/19/119/23/11

Fingerprint

computer game
Sports
Testing
performance
simulation
experience
Violence
violence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Marraffino, M. D., Heather, Lum, H. C., Sims, V. K., Chin, M. G., Halse, S. E., & Lippman, B. (2011). So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 (pp. 1516-1519) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551315
Marraffino, Matthew D. ; Heather, ; Lum, Heather C. ; Sims, Valerie K. ; Chin, Matthew G. ; Halse, Shane E. ; Lippman, Bradley. / So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. pp. 1516-1519
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Marraffino, MD, Heather, , Lum, HC, Sims, VK, Chin, MG, Halse, SE & Lippman, B 2011, So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. pp. 1516-1519, 55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011, Las Vegas, NV, United States, 9/19/11. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551315

So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance. / Marraffino, Matthew D.; Heather, ; Lum, Heather C.; Sims, Valerie K.; Chin, Matthew G.; Halse, Shane E.; Lippman, Bradley.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. p. 1516-1519.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Marraffino MD, Heather , Lum HC, Sims VK, Chin MG, Halse SE et al. So you think you know football? Effects of individual differences on video game performance. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, HFES 2011. 2011. p. 1516-1519 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551315