Social and genetic influences on adolescent religious attitudes and practices

Lindon J. Eaves, Peter K. Hatemi, Elizabeth C. Prom-Womley, Lenn Murrelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors explore the contributions of social and genetic influences to religious attitudes and practices in a population-based sample of 11-18 year olds and their mothers who responded to a Religious Attitudes and Practices Inventory and Religious Rearing Practices Inventory respectively. Contrary to genetic studies examining adult religious behavior, genetic influences were small, accounting for only 10 percent of the variance. Rather, the effects of the social environment were much larger, greater than 50 percent, and a majority of offspring similarity was explained by familial rearing. In light of the divergent finding between adolescents and adults, one supporting a socialization model and the other a genetic model, the importance of integrating genetic and social science methodology for complex social behaviors is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1621-1646
Number of pages26
JournalSocial Forces
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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religious attitude
adolescent
social behavior
socialization
religious behavior
social science
Religion
methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Eaves, Lindon J. ; Hatemi, Peter K. ; Prom-Womley, Elizabeth C. ; Murrelle, Lenn. / Social and genetic influences on adolescent religious attitudes and practices. In: Social Forces. 2008 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 1621-1646.
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Social and genetic influences on adolescent religious attitudes and practices. / Eaves, Lindon J.; Hatemi, Peter K.; Prom-Womley, Elizabeth C.; Murrelle, Lenn.

In: Social Forces, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.06.2008, p. 1621-1646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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