Social anxiety and computer-mediated communication during initial interactions: Implications for the hyperpersonal perspective

Andrew High, Scott E. Caplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study examined how the reduced nonverbal cues characteristic of computer-mediated communication (CMC) moderated the potentially negative interpersonal outcomes of social anxiety in initial interactions. Hypotheses predicted that CMC would mitigate the extent to which social anxiety caused interpersonal perceptions of anxiety and that CMC would attenuate the negative association between one's social anxiety and one's partner's conversational satisfaction. A sample (N = 206) of undergraduate students were paired in unacquainted dyads and then engaged in initial interaction conversations in either a face-to-face (FtF) or CMC context. The researchers measured social anxiety before the conversation and a number of outcomes after the conversation. The results revealed that CMC is a significant contingent condition to the association between social anxiety and one's partner's perception of this anxiety and a contingent condition to the association between social anxiety and one's partner's conversational satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-482
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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