Social climate for sexual minorities predicts well-being among heterosexual offspring of lesbian and gay parents

David J. Lick, Samantha L. Tornello, Rachel G. Riskind, Karen M. Schmidt, Charlotte J. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social climate-specifically, the level of support for sexual minorities in a given locale-helps to explain well-being among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. No published reports have examined whether wellbeing also varies as a function of social climate for family members of LGB individuals. We present results from two studies (Study 1, n=69; Study 2, n=70) demonstrating that social climate predicts well-being among adults reared by LGB parents, regardless of their own sexual orientation. Across both studies, population characteristics (e.g., density of same-sex couples in an area) emerged as the strongest and most consistent predictors of well-being. Some variables assessing local politics (e.g., LGB hate crime policy) also predicted well-being, though these associations were less robust. Overall, findings suggest that the social environment for sexual minorities is an important correlate of psychological adjustment for many Americans, regardless of their sexual orientation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-112
Number of pages14
JournalSexuality Research and Social Policy
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Fingerprint

Heterosexuality
parents
Parents
well-being
minority
climate
sexual orientation
hate crime
local politics
family member
Sexual Minorities
Sexual Behavior
Hate
Social Environment
Crime
Population Characteristics
Politics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Lick, David J. ; Tornello, Samantha L. ; Riskind, Rachel G. ; Schmidt, Karen M. ; Patterson, Charlotte J. / Social climate for sexual minorities predicts well-being among heterosexual offspring of lesbian and gay parents. In: Sexuality Research and Social Policy. 2012 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 99-112.
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Social climate for sexual minorities predicts well-being among heterosexual offspring of lesbian and gay parents. / Lick, David J.; Tornello, Samantha L.; Riskind, Rachel G.; Schmidt, Karen M.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

In: Sexuality Research and Social Policy, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.06.2012, p. 99-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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